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Thread: What's the origin of the Japanese people ?

  1. #126
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    I think alot of confusion could be avoided if we distinguish between the type of Japanese, and use precise language..i.e. Yayoi-Japanese. Just as people distinguish between Malay-Indonesians and Chinese-Indonesians. I also observed here that people referring to the Han Chinese as though they are of uniform ethnicity. But the 'Han' Chineses truly homogeneous people? People from different parts of China seem to have distinguishing features. Further, the Chinese migrants in S-E asian countries, Hong Kong and Taiwan also look somewhat different from the majority of the mainland's regions from my personal experience, but that's going out of topic.

  2. #127
    JREF Resident Alien Pachipro's Avatar
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    Have not really researched the subject thoroughly, but here is an interesting theory that you might find interesting concerning "Who Are The Japanese?"

    Any thoughts?
    Do What You Love And You'll Never Work Another Day In Your Life!


  3. #128
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    Can't see any resemblance between Jews and modern Japanese, which looks more similar to other neighboring east asians.

  4. #129
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    I think there are@so many middle east or mexican looking peoples in japan.
    japanese ppl is basicaly thickly haired more than other east asian
    If the Japanese has mustache and beard , it is likely to understand clearly.
    Last edited by caster51; Jul 11, 2006 at 13:35.

  5. #130
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    Indeed,there are many illegal Mexicans living in California claimed " Japanese blood " relation with understanding of their Aztec ancestors left ASIA CONTINENT over 10,000 years ago.



    Mexicans can go to Japan fill those 3D jobs plus a chance to rekindle " special ancestral roots " with Japanese people,they're quite hard working we can ensure you on that.

  6. #131
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    An interesting read about the Hakka ethnic group living in China. http://www.amoymagic.com/FJAdv/Roundhouses.htm

    The relationship between the Hakkas and the Japanese was also echoed here.

    Also, http://www.cbs.org.tw/english/hakka/p42.html

  7. #132
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    http://www.asiawind.com/hakka/histor...%20in%20Fujian
    Comments? Further these Hakka (Guest/Migrating People orginated from Northen China) people have contributed significantly to the population of the Chineses people now living all over SE-Asia, Taiwan, HongKong, and many now reside in the Fujian/Guandong region of China and they have only relatively recently been accepted as part of the Han Chineses cultural group.

    Hakka and Japanese Culture

    Hakka culture might be a key component of Japanese culture.
    It is hard not to notice that spoken Hakka dialect/language and Japanese language are closer than Mandarin and Japanese. Certain Japanese also resemble Shandong Chinese, distinct from the Ainu features of Hokkaido. Some Japanese friends point out that Hakkas look like Japanese. In fact the strong adherance to tradition and stubbornness are very characteristic of both Hakka and Japanese. The following is an account that could provide some support to the link between Hakka and Japanese culture.
    Qin dynasty, Xu Fu, Yamoto, and Yayoi culture
    The earliest record of Chinese travelling to Japan was in Qin dynasty when Qin Shihuangdi sent Xu Fu with a company of 3000 boys and girls to obtain longevity medicine. They started out from Shandong and reached what they called Peng Lai (Ying Zhou) which is Kyushu today. In Kyushu, there are significant traces of Xu Fu and his company including Xu Fu's tomb. Xu Fu's landing place should be around Fukuoka (The Hill of Fu), which was named in memory of him.
    To be entrusted by Qin Shihuangdi with such an enormous task at that time, Xu Fu at 36 years of age was obviously a very capable person who was also higher up in the official rank. One theory is that he actually used this proposal to leave Qin. He brought a whole fleet of ships fully loaded with all kinds of supplies. It is also clear that Xu Fu had travelled back to China more than once to gather supplies. So, likely he brought more people over for the long trip. The crew he brought over stayed in Japan and became the Yamato clan. That is why some Japanese look like Shandong people, which should be Han/Hakka in genetic trait.
    The history of Japan is very vague as to how the empire started. Only legends exist. Japanese culture has two major components: The Jomon culture and the Yayoi culture. The native Jomon culture was based on hunting and fishing, dating back to 10,000 years ago.
    The Yayoi culture, which suddenly emerged around 250 BC - 250 AD as a very advanced culture, bears all the marks of Qin/Han culture including paddy rice cultivation, bronze mirror, coins, bronze weapons, bells, etc. The three major symbols of the Japanese Kingdom : bronze mirror, sword, and the royal seal stone are exactly the same as the Qin symbols. With no archaeological precedent of a gradual evolution, Yayoi culture has to be introduced from outside, and the most probable source was China. The Yayoi culture spread northeastward towards the Kanto plain and eventually became the mainstream of the Japanese culture.
    Japan's celebration of the "birthyear" of Shen Wu Tian Huang (Ten-no) was held every 50 years (last held 1930 and 1980) as a very sacred ceremony simultaneously in a memorial celebration of Xu Fu. The beginning of Shen Wu Tian Huang was in the same time period of Xu Fu's landing in 219 BC. So these two are too coincidental not to be related. Shen Wu Tian Huang is supposed to be the Father of the Japanese kingdom. The celebration actually could be for the birthyear of the Empire rather than a person.
    Did Xu Fu start out from Shandong or Guangdong?
    There is also a hypothesis that Xu Fu started out from Guangdong because the spoken Japanese sounds like Guangdong dialect more than Mandarin. However, Qin Shihuangdi's active area was in the north. It would be hard to trust someone so far from the south. The climbing of Taishan (Shandong) by Qin Shihuangdi was well documented by Li Si's stone engravings on Taishan. So, Shandong is a place frequented by QSHD. It is natural that he might want to watch the ships set sail to fetch the longevity medicine too. As pointed out by a netter friend, Shandong dialect actually has some similarities to Hakka (see language page). If Hakka was indeed the official language commonly used in Qin-Tang dynasties, then that was the language Xu Fu and his crew spoke. So, it would be natural for the Japanese spoken language to bear some resemblance of Hakka.
    For detailed evidence of Xu Fu's excursion to Japan, please consult a book by Yu Jin Hong : "Xu2 Fu2 Dong1 Du4 Zhi1 Mi2 Xin1 Tan4" (A New Study on the Riddle of the East Expedition by Xu Fu), Jiangsu People's Press. 1990.
    Buddhism, Wei - Tang period
    Buddhism was spread to Japan during Wei-Jin and Tang period. There were more and more interactions between the two countries. In Wei Zhi (history of Wei) the word "Wo" (Japanese "Wa", Mandarin "He") first appeared to represent the Japanese kingdom.
    Hakka language was highly likely the official language in Tang dynasty (see language section about Tang poems). In Japan, much of the government bureaucratic system, including the names of bureaus still use the system developed from Qin-Han to Tang period.
    Examples of ancient Han/Hakka culture and Japanese culture
    Japanese culture retains many of the ancient Chinese custom including deep bowing, seating on tatami with low table (only after Song did high chairs become popular in China), the women's dress and headdress, the way pipa ( a pluck string musical instrument, Japanese call it biwa) is held at an angle rather than upright. These can be easily verified in the murals of Dun Huang, which were done from Wei-Jin to Tang. In terms of calligraphy, the early Japanese masters favored Wang Xi-Zhi (Jin) while the contemporaries follow Yan Zhen-qing (Tang).
    Please see a copy of Wang Xi-Zhi's "Lanting Prologue" in my own calligraphy (142K), or a a section of larger size (67K). I have also translated Lan Ting Xu (Prologue for the the Gathering at Orchid Pavillion") into English.
    Because Xu Fu went to Japan prior to the purge of Confucianism by Qin Shihuangdi, in some ways the earlier Han/Hakka culture was preserved in the original form more so in Japan.
    So, Hakka has significant influence on Japanese culture.
    The following is a letter from a Japanese friend supporting the similarity of Hakka and Japanese characteristics.
    From [email protected]e Feb 13 0921 1996
    Date: Mon, 12 Feb 1996 2037 +0900
    From: Kobo Inamura
    To: "'[email protected]'"
    Subject: Hakka culture and Japan
    Dear Sir,
    I read your article on the Hakka Home page with enthusiasm.
    It is true that the characteristics of the independent, but probably the
    most conservative minded or stubbornness to preserve one's culture are held
    much in common by Hakka people and Japanese.
    I met several students in Japan, who happened to come from Mainland China,
    but their behavior seems to be different from ideology indoctrinated
    students from Beijing.
    The architecture of the round big house tradition still remains in this
    country, even though fading out quickly.
    I wish your study of the relations between Hakka and Japan further develop
    into the future.
    At least I have never heard of Hakka persons who did not feel comfortable to
    stay in Japan and vice versa.
    Probably one more thing in common is that they(Hakka and Japanese) are the
    most enthusiastic book readers. Do you know any country where so much number
    of books and titles are published? Japanese are reading books even in the
    crowded trains.
    Sincerely yours,
    Kobo Inamura
    First posted December 5, 1995.
    All rights reserved. S. L. Lee. 1995.
    #top

  8. #133
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    The "theory" on Hun origin of Hakka was based on very fragmentary blood typing and DNA analysis done by Japanese and Russian researchers.

    According to DNA typing by Hideo Matsumoto (1966) who gathered blood from China, Korea, Rusia, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia countries and found the folloiwng: [extracted from Kiang's book]
    ¡@

    GM genes
    ¡@ AG AxG ABST AFBB
    North Mongoloids (Koreans, Japanese, Hakka) 45% 15% 25% 15%
    Malaysian, Polynesian, Southern Chinese

    10%
    5% 85%
    Burma, Assam, Tibetan, Nepal, Malayo-Polynesian ~0% ~100%

    The author thus concludes that Hakkas like Koreans and Japanese were from Baikal Lake as a subgroup of the Altaic people.

  9. #134
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    Funny,Hakka people have blood-tie to Koreans and Japanese.
    Last edited by ricecake; Jul 13, 2006 at 02:26.

  10. #135
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    Talking Does Minty suffer from poor eyesight...

    ...or is there something else that hinders her power of discernment?

    I'm a white American guy, and even I can tell Japanese people apart from other Asians. To put it bluntly, most Japanese persons look like the hybrid offspring of a pair consisting of an East Asian and a southern European (Greek or Jew?). That's not to say that the Japanese are closely related to any extant European population; in fact, I am almost certain that they are very distant from each other in terms of line of descent. The fact remains, however, that morphologically at least, Japanese people have a relatively high incidence of certain physical traits that are extremely rare among other East Asian populations. I think this is likely to be due to "shared retention" by the ancestors of the Europeans and the Japanese aborigines of a certain suite of physical traits that was typical of the original Eurasians, while the ancestors of continental East Asians underwent several severe changes to their skeletal (and especially facial) morphology during their most recent stage of evolution. This scenario seems to be supported by the fact that ancient skeletons of modern humans found anywhere in Eurasia, and even the oldest human skeletons found in the Americas, all appear to possess rather Caucasoid morphology, and skeletons that exhibit the prototypical features of the Mongoloid race appear only later in the archaeological record.

    I rarely have any difficulty distinguishing Japanese from Chinese or Koreans, but the continentals can be a troublesome bunch.

    The unusual features of the Japanese that set them apart clearly in most cases from any of the continental East Asians are:

    1) Japanese tend to have a more pronounced facial topography (i.e., a rather "bumpy" or "projecting" look to the face, such as around the eyebrows, rather than the smooth and flat contours of Chinese or Koreans)

    2) Japanese tend to have a more perceptually salient nose. This can be either more salient in simply the degree of projection from the surface of the face, or more salient in terms of the total volume of the nose (i.e., including the width). In general, Japanese seem to exhibit a much greater variety of nose sizes and shapes than do continental East Asians, and I have met many Japanese who even have "bumpy" noses with several bulges and constrictions in the contour of the nose, as I have otherwise only observed in Europeans. Chinese and Koreans appear to have only smooth-contoured noses, regardless of whether they are flat and broad (as is common in southern Chinese, Vietnamese, etc.) or narrow and slightly projecting. This feature is particularly relevant for distinguishing Japanese men from Chinese or Korean men, because women of every nationality tend to be rather paedomorphic when it comes to their noses.

    3) Japanese people tend to have a diminutive lower facial region. They often have small jaws, which may be the direct cause of their propensity for having poor alignment of the teeth. Continental East Asians, on the other hand, seem to have huge jaws, flaring malars (cheekbones), and a generally large and imposing lower face when viewed from a Caucasian perspective.

    4) Japanese people often have rather translucent skin, similar to that of Europeans, when they are not tanned. Therefore, Japanese people often have rosy cheeks and a generally healthy-looking complexion. When they do tan, they tend to take on a reddish-brown color. The Chinese and Koreans, on the other hand, are almost all cream- or beige-colored ("pasty") from the start, and they have completely opaque skin, so that it is impossible for them to have rosy cheeks and they always look sort of sickly unless they are tanned, in which case they take on a yellow-brown color.

    As for distinguishing Chinese and Koreans by sight, I think it is quite difficult, but not impossible. They both have a propensity for big faces with a smoothly rounded outline, but Koreans tend to be more extreme in the width of their faces, so that they often have a nearly circular look, whereas Chinese tend to have more elliptical faces when viewed directly from the front. Chinese also more frequently have double eyelids and larger eyes that seem to bulge out of their (flat) sockets. Korean people tend to have very small eyes and no eyelid creases. Among East Asians, Chinese people also have a peculiar tendency towards prognathism, so that they often have bulging mouths that look somewhat reminiscent of black Africans. The big, bulgy eyes and mouth that appear so frequently among Chinese people seem to me to suggest some sort of affinity with populations of Southeast Asia. Also, I'm not totally sure about this, but I have a hunch that Koreans more frequently have a sort of oily shine to their skin, whereas Chinese people's skin tends to be more dull and dry-looking.

  11. #136
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    Some Japanese scientists discovered a population of tattoo'ed indigenous SE Asian tribe in Burma in the 1980's,proclaimed these people are Japanese's ancestors.
    Last edited by ricecake; Jul 13, 2006 at 07:47.

  12. #137
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    interesting story about •Ό—§_‹{(Heitate-jingu kumamoto)
    http://www.eva.hi-ho.ne.jp/suruga/heitategoopage.htm
    ‚U‚O‚O‚O”N‘O‚©‚η‚ ‚Α‚½•ΆŽš‚ō‚ά‚κ‚Δ‚’‚ι‚Ζ‚’‚’‚ά‚·
    @@@•\F@gƒAƒ\ƒqƒmƒIƒIƒJƒ~h|||ˆ’‘h“ϊ‚Μ‘ε_ i”μ_‚̏‘i‘Ξ”n‚Μˆ’”δ—―•ΆŽš(_‘γ•ΆŽšj‚Ζ“―‘Μ‚Ε‹LΪ
    http://www.kumashoko.or.jp/soyou/spot/heiritsu.htm
    http://judith1c.exblog.jp/i11/
    Judith Carpenter, a famous psychics healer, She has been participating in the festival for more than ten years .
    It is said that the Heitate Shrine has a duty to care for the peace of the world. The shrine is the keeper of the efive masksf and each year on August 23 a ceremony is held for world peace.
    Since the ceremonies have been public, I have represented the white mask - one day we all look forward to the day all masks may be represented for peace.
    FIVE MASK MEANING: Five coloured people to gather at the Shrine so everyone is one.
    http://www.judithcarpenter.com/gallery.html
    •Ό—§_‹{‚Ν‹γB‚Μ‚Φ‚»‚ΙˆΚ’u‚·‚ιA‚“VŒ΄_˜b”­Λ‚Μ’n ‚Ε‚·B‘ΎŒΓ‚̐̂©‚琒ŠEl—ή‚Μ‘c_‚πβJ‚Α‚½‚Ζ‚³‚κ‚Δ‚’ ‚ά‚·B‚»‚΅‚āA‚±‚κ‚πŽΐΨ‚·‚鐔X‚ΜΨ‚Μˆκ‚Β‚Ζ‚΅‚āu ŒάF_–ʁv‚ΖŒΔ‚Ξ‚κ‚ιA’ŠElŽν‚Μ‘c_‚πŒ`‚Η‚Α‚½–ؐ»‚Μ’€‘œ–Κ‚ͺ•ς”[‚³‚κ‚Δ‚’‚ά‚·B‚±‚ΜŒάF_–Κ‚ΜŒάF‚Ƃ́A’ŠE‚ΜŒά‘εlŽν‚Μ”§‚̐F‚π •\‚΅‚½‚ΰ‚̂ŁA‚»‚Μ‹NŒΉ‚Ζ‚³‚κ‚Δ‚’‚ι‚Μ‚ͺA‰©l(ƒAƒWƒ AŒn)‚Ε‚·B‚»‚΅‚āA‚»‚ΜŒγ”ή‚η‚ΜŽq‘·‚ͺ’ŠEŠe’n‚ɍL‚ͺ ‚θA‚»‚Μ•—“y‚β‹CŒσ‚Θ‚Η‚Ι‰e‹Ώ‚πŽσ‚―AΤl(ƒlƒCƒeƒBƒuEƒAƒƒŠƒJƒ“)AΒl(ƒAƒWƒA“μ•”)A”’ l(”’lŒn)A•l(•lŒn)‚Φ‚Ζ”hΆ‚΅‚½‚Ζ‚’‚ν‚κ‚Δ‚’‚ά‚·
    ŒΓ‘γƒGƒWƒvƒgAƒ†ƒ_ƒ„l(ˆκΰ‚Ε‚Νƒ‚[ƒ[)‚Ι‚ζ‚Α‚Δ‰^‚Ξ‚κ‚½u…‚̋ʁv‚ΰ•ς”[
    B
    they said "All races have spreaded from here".
    japanese Kabbalah
    http://www006.upp.so-net.ne.jp/yuyum...qbl-index.html
    Last edited by caster51; Jul 13, 2006 at 13:26.

  13. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by konnyaku
    ...or is there something else that hinders her power of discernment?
    .
    Mind you the Japanese themselves can't tell I am not Japanese. It is them who mistaken me as one of them. I often get them approaching me because they thought I am Japanese. Most of the time I can tell Japanese, Korean and Chinese apart, I never approached a Chinese who is Japanese before.

    You may be able to tell the different East Asians apart but many other white people can't, my experiences tell me that.

  14. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by konnyaku View Post
    ...or is there something else that hinders her power of discernment?
    I'm a white American guy, and even I can tell Japanese people apart from other Asians. To put it bluntly, most Japanese persons look like the hybrid offspring of a pair consisting of an East Asian and a southern European (Greek or Jew?). That's not to say that the Japanese are closely related to any extant European population; in fact, I am almost certain that they are very distant from each other in terms of line of descent. The fact remains, however, that morphologically at least, Japanese people have a relatively high incidence of certain physical traits that are extremely rare among other East Asian populations. I think this is likely to be due to "shared retention" by the ancestors of the Europeans and the Japanese aborigines of a certain suite of physical traits that was typical of the original Eurasians, while the ancestors of continental East Asians underwent several severe changes to their skeletal (and especially facial) morphology during their most recent stage of evolution. This scenario seems to be supported by the fact that ancient skeletons of modern humans found anywhere in Eurasia, and even the oldest human skeletons found in the Americas, all appear to possess rather Caucasoid morphology, and skeletons that exhibit the prototypical features of the Mongoloid race appear only later in the archaeological record.
    I rarely have any difficulty distinguishing Japanese from Chinese or Koreans, but the continentals can be a troublesome bunch.
    The unusual features of the Japanese that set them apart clearly in most cases from any of the continental East Asians are:
    1) Japanese tend to have a more pronounced facial topography (i.e., a rather "bumpy" or "projecting" look to the face, such as around the eyebrows, rather than the smooth and flat contours of Chinese or Koreans)
    2) Japanese tend to have a more perceptually salient nose. This can be either more salient in simply the degree of projection from the surface of the face, or more salient in terms of the total volume of the nose (i.e., including the width). In general, Japanese seem to exhibit a much greater variety of nose sizes and shapes than do continental East Asians, and I have met many Japanese who even have "bumpy" noses with several bulges and constrictions in the contour of the nose, as I have otherwise only observed in Europeans. Chinese and Koreans appear to have only smooth-contoured noses, regardless of whether they are flat and broad (as is common in southern Chinese, Vietnamese, etc.) or narrow and slightly projecting. This feature is particularly relevant for distinguishing Japanese men from Chinese or Korean men, because women of every nationality tend to be rather paedomorphic when it comes to their noses.
    3) Japanese people tend to have a diminutive lower facial region. They often have small jaws, which may be the direct cause of their propensity for having poor alignment of the teeth. Continental East Asians, on the other hand, seem to have huge jaws, flaring malars (cheekbones), and a generally large and imposing lower face when viewed from a Caucasian perspective.
    4) Japanese people often have rather translucent skin, similar to that of Europeans, when they are not tanned. Therefore, Japanese people often have rosy cheeks and a generally healthy-looking complexion. When they do tan, they tend to take on a reddish-brown color. The Chinese and Koreans, on the other hand, are almost all cream- or beige-colored ("pasty") from the start, and they have completely opaque skin, so that it is impossible for them to have rosy cheeks and they always look sort of sickly unless they are tanned, in which case they take on a yellow-brown color.
    As for distinguishing Chinese and Koreans by sight, I think it is quite difficult, but not impossible. They both have a propensity for big faces with a smoothly rounded outline, but Koreans tend to be more extreme in the width of their faces, so that they often have a nearly circular look, whereas Chinese tend to have more elliptical faces when viewed directly from the front. Chinese also more frequently have double eyelids and larger eyes that seem to bulge out of their (flat) sockets. Korean people tend to have very small eyes and no eyelid creases. Among East Asians, Chinese people also have a peculiar tendency towards prognathism, so that they often have bulging mouths that look somewhat reminiscent of black Africans. The big, bulgy eyes and mouth that appear so frequently among Chinese people seem to me to suggest some sort of affinity with populations of Southeast Asia. Also, I'm not totally sure about this, but I have a hunch that Koreans more frequently have a sort of oily shine to their skin, whereas Chinese people's skin tends to be more dull and dry-looking.
    This is a very insightful comment. I am amazed how you can figure out all these details despite your white background.

  15. #140
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    Hmmm..... Quick Question, even though I am new here, I was wondering, who exactly are the Ainu/Jomon? Were they descendants of a group of Africans (proto-negroid or negroid) that settled in South Asia and then traveled to Japan?

    Second, about the features of Japanese folks. I understand some (not all) have Caucasoid features. But how much of the features and how frequent?

    Third, I know this is off topic, but in regards to China (and well Japan too), were the first dynasties/ruling parties/governments Black?

  16. #141
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    Marky> you are about 9 months off topic.... you might want to start a new thread.

  17. #142
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    The Orgin's of the Japanese

    The Japanese origin's are from Africa some 1000years ago,
    The first people that left Africa were from East Africa.
    skeleton remains were said to reseblem Negroid, from Cave Mintojawa.
    These findings cannot be found in any school or Library.
    Modern human's evolved from a single Afrikan origin's as opposed to the multiple origin's. These 65 branches of Afrikan race share similar DNA mutation with the Chinese and Koreans.
    DNA that provide information about GENETIC -variations among people
    were examineded, and they revealed that all Afrikan's and Japanese have
    A great deal in common genetically.
    This research broke the theory that Ainu were the ancestor's of the Japanese.
    The slanted eye is a trait which came from the Afrikan's.
    This facial type is typically Negritic, common racial characterstic generally found in east afrika. At the bottom of this is the ancestor of the Japanese.

  18. #143
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    The Japanese originated from Korea. This is borne by western research studies on genetics, cultural and linguistics which all agree on the Korean origination hypothesis, although Japanese and Chinese researchers themselves have a personal bias and hidden agenda and would rather obscure this tie with Korea. But the relationship is obvious first from the similarity of the language---as someone pointed out earlier, Korean sounds like another dialect of Japnese---to even anyone who is unfamiliar with any studies. Here are some more facts: 1) The first horses that appeared on Japanese islands came from Korea 2000 years ago. 2) Korea and Japanese grammar is nearly identical. 3) Kyushu which is closest to the Southern tip of Korea is hypothesized as the place as where Japanese cultural bloom began because it is the area in which you will find the oldest and culturally significant early Japanese artifacts. As mentioned, Kyushu is closest to the Southern tip of Korean. The early Japanese artifacts unearthed are identical to artifacts unearthed in the area of Southern Korea in the same time period

    I would recommend the book Korean Impact on Japanese Culture: Japan's Hidden History by Jon Covell and Alan Covell for those interested in this topic.

  19. #144
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    korean does not have a DNA YAP+ at all that 50% of japanese men have.

    I would recommend the book Korean Impact on Japanese Culture: Japan's Hidden History by Jon Covell and Alan Covell for those interested in this topic.
    they are neither archeologist nor histrian.
    they are art scholar............

  20. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by allq View Post

    The Japanese originated from Korea.
    http://www.hanbooks.com/hanofkor.html

    The Koreans originated from China & Mongolia

  21. #146
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    I've never claimed Koreans are identical in DNA as Japanese. It is obvious that Japanese are a mix of races like Jomon and Yayoi which is the prevailing view among scholars. Japanese have multiple origins including Malay/Polynesian, Ainu. Still, it is interesting that when you speak about Japanese early history, linguistics and such it's synominous with Korean, such as the example of the first horse ever appearing on the Japanese islands came from Korea thousands of years ago. While the horerider theory of the 1960's developed by a Japanese was never fully tested because there was no way to examine DNA at the time, modern DNA studies verified that the first horses were Korean. So the horses which is depicted in Kurosawa samarai movies came from Korea interestingly enough. As any Japanese historian would know, horses were held in high esteem in early Japanese history FYI.

    Other facts: the reverential Nihongi which is the holy grail of early Japanese (or history of how Japan first began) history revered by Japanese historians is written by a Korean. In the Nihongi, there are hundreds of entries about trade and exchange with Korea which is meticulously recorded, whereas curiously hardly any mention (zero?) of any such exchange with China.

    Carter and Covell do an excellent job of examining early Japanese art and architecture and finding its exact replica in early Korean art, especially of the Paekje era. The similarities are undeniable.

    "The Koreans originated from China & Mongolia "---Uh proof? You've linked to a book but there is no mention in the link of your assertion that "Koreans originated from China & Mongolia." Phony link, don't you think? The link is abit phony like your post?


    Koreans did not originate from China. Koreans probably confuse Mongolia with Siberia since that they are in the same region. The prevailing view among scholars is that Koreans originated from the Siberian region---and this similarity is borne out by physical distinctiveness of Korean appearance in terms of height, stocky build etc. which is obviously very different from Chinese who generally do not have the same build or look. Koreans do share some genetic similarities with people of Manchurian region because Koreans originally lived in that region, not that they originated there, before migrating further south to the peninsula which is consistent with the history recorded for the Korean kingdoms, Paekje, Silla Koguryo.

    Posts so far proves my point that there are personal biases among Chinese and Japanese to obscure any relationship. Still, the predominance of evidence is irrefutable and there are countless scientific study after study on this topic (in diverse fields like linguistic, genetic, cultural, historic, archeological) which come out with the same exact conclusion. A simple search on the internet would suffice for any unbiased research on this topic, preferably one from a westerner.
    Last edited by allq; Oct 4, 2007 at 18:36.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tokapi View Post
    The Koreans originated from China & Mongolia
    Mostly Mongolia. I agree with allq that they are more Siberian than they are Chinese.

  23. #148
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    ^^^Koreans do not originate from China. This is borne out in a number of DNA studies which shows that Korean DNA is distinctive from Chinese DNA, hence indicating different origins. To anyone unfamiliar with these studies, it would still be obvious from the fact that Koreans and Chinese do not even look similar.

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  25. #150
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    ^^^It's quite pathetic that you post pics of actresses to prove your idiotic case. Also, aren't you the one who provided that phony link hanbooks.com for your flimsy case that Koreans originate from China? Please do not waste bandwith with your fake and misleading posts to spread your sinocentric propanda which proves nothing.

    Also, every researcher knows that you need DNA to prove for any case concerning origins. DNA studies all confirm that Korean and Chinese have different origins and Koreans are NOT related to Chinese.

    There is solid DNA evidence that Chinese have origins in SE asia. Also, many Chinese I've seen do look amazingly like Vietnamese. I can't tell them apart most of the time. In fact, Chinese and Vietnamese and Thai languages sound extremely similar, all being tonal languages. Thai language supposedly originated in China.

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