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Thread: Discrimination in Japan

  1. #76
    Finally Enlighted One Buddha Smoker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golgo_13
    I assumed so but wasn't sure if you mean where you live or Japan, etc.

  2. #77
    Samurai Golgo_13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo
    Golgo, maybe you should read the whole sentence before comenting it.. The answer lies just after the comma : "Japan is a country where few people believe strongly in religious, political or philosophical ideas. In other words, morals and ideals are not a major concern, because people rely a lot on common sense and values inculcated by the educational system or the society"
    I didn't have to. "[M]orals and ideals are not a major concern [to them]" was all I needed to see. I inferred that to mean that the Japanese are immoral. IMO, morals are important in any society, and Japanese certainly have them. Perhaps your idea of what a moral is is different from mine.

    "The Japanese do things that may be considered immoral by other cultures"

    As long as they're done inside Japan I would think what they consider moral or immoral is more important, not other cultures.

  3. #78
    Regular Member Jean-Francois's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlogD
    [a certain nationalist arrogance Japan was feeling at the time due to their economic dominance

    If this theory is true, then foreigners in Japan better be well-prepared

    The Japanese economy is heading to a strong recovery. Growth (the increase of consumer confidence and purchasing power of the Japanese people) is coming from inside while threats (fear of terrorist attack in the US market and tightening of monetary policy in mainland China) are coming from outside. However, threats 危 also create opportunities 機 . For the same reasons, a lot of money from the Hong Kong and US stock exchanges has flowed into Japanese mutual funds.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamer
    no Chineses allowed
    Yeah, that was a hot topic of various radio talk shows in Hong Kong last summer. And most of the Chinese newspaper headlines read some like this:

    Shame on Chinese people -
    Slaughtered host family in Japan!

    or

    Shame on Chinese people -
    Committed more than 50% of crimes in Japan!

    And yes ... the HK media says more than 50%.

  4. #79
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golgo_13
    I didn't have to. "[M]orals and ideals are not a major concern [to them]" was all I needed to see. I inferred that to mean that the Japanese are immoral. IMO, morals are important in any society, and Japanese certainly have them. Perhaps your idea of what a moral is is different from mine.
    Completely different, apparently... It has always been clear to me that morals is something that is acquired and rigid. People need to be taught morals and follow those very strict rules, even when it doesn't make sense. For example, if Christian morals says "you must not lie", then you just cannot lie without commiting a sin, even when it would be better for everybody if you did. The problem of morals is that it is rigid and opposes common sense and reason. As a philosopher, I believe that people fall in the world fall in 3 categories :

    1) Those who use (religious) "morals" they were taught and don't have to think about why it is this way, just follow it. This is usually related to strong religiousness.
    2) Those who follow their common sense, which is somewhat acquired by the culture and society you live in.
    3) Those who use their logic and reason in a case by case manner, so that they always choose the best solution adapted to the situation.

    Japanese mostly fall in the 2nd category. Americans from the Bible belt (South East) and Muslims around the world typically fall into the first category. I am part of the 3rd category, which is also unfortunately the rarest (as people don't like to use their brains). Lot's of people use a combination of the 3.

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  5. #80
    Regular Member Jean-Francois's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Dreamer
    no Chineses allowed

    I am very sorry ... it should be Dream Time. I know you two are different. Dreamer from Paris has short hair and glasses and Dream Time from Vancouver has long hair and a high forehead.

    I was just eating my dinner, reading and typing at the same time ... Oh, man! Now I have to apologise for being off-topic

  6. #81
    As the Rush Comes Duo's Avatar
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    Can I ask if a foreigner was to be married with a Japanese citizen, or if after he/she had lived a long time legally in Japan, could he/she ask and receive Japanese citizenship ?

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duo
    Can I ask if a foreigner was to be married with a Japanese citizen, or if after he/she had lived a long time legally in Japan, could he/she ask and receive Japanese citizenship ?
    Difficult question..depends on the circumstances and the person honestly. I have known people that applied and got it within a couple years and others that have been applying for 20+ years and yet to receive it...what is the difference between the two.....not that much honestly.

  8. #83
    Occasional visitor nekosasori's Avatar
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    Regardless though, Japan won't accept multiple citizenships if I recall correctly. My parents had to relinquish their Japanese status in order to become Canadians.

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by nekosasori
    Regardless though, Japan won't accept multiple citizenships if I recall correctly. My parents had to relinquish their Japanese status in order to become Canadians.
    That is true..I forgot to mention that Japan, (Germany, I think), and one more country somewhere (Don't you love my specifics..LOL ) are the only countries in the world that don't allow multiple/dual citizenships.

    At least until the age of 24 or 26 (not 18, like most people think) then they are suppose to choose, if my memory recalls correctly.

  10. #85
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    Until recently (2001?) Australians couldn't hold dual citizen ship either. weird...

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ewok85
    Until recently (2001?) Australians couldn't hold dual citizen ship either. weird...
    I stand corrected already....LOL..four countries but I think there are some other too but the American Embassy in Tokyo told me the three countries but that was back in 1999 to 2001, I think.

  12. #87
    Cute and Furry Ewok85's Avatar
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    Theres a few, I'll find the list ;)

    Austria
    Belgium
    Brunei
    Chile
    China
    Denmark
    Ecuador
    Fiji
    Finland
    Germany
    Iceland
    India
    Indonesia
    Iran*
    Japan
    Kenya
    Kiribati
    Malaysia
    Mauritius
    Myanmar
    Nepal
    Norway
    Papua New Guinea
    Peru
    Philippines
    Poland
    Romania
    Singapore
    Solomon Islands
    Thailand
    Vietnam
    Venezuela
    Zimbabwe
    * Does not recognise dual citizenship but continues to recognise its citizens as Iranian
    http://www.citizenship.gov.au/0601paper/08.htm

    I think seiza is in order! mwhahaha

  13. #88
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    Alot of countries say that they don't recognize it but that doesn't mean they don't allow it....

    I know alof of countries have started to change and it is mainly due to the rich people of the world collecting as many citizenships as they could for fun and for tax evasion...that's what started it.

  14. #89
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    I never had a problem with discrimination in Japan. As long as you keep an open mind, be polite and patient people will treat you well.

  15. #90
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    as a teenager, i lived in okinawa for a few years. i saw the subtle hostility directed against the american servicemen and their families. while it was disturbing to witness, it was somewhat gratifying, too. i'm japanese-american and was raised in the southern united states. this reverse descrimination was novel, to say the least. however, a part of me still empathized with them...after all, i'm american, too.

    the okinawans' resentment may have been perpetuated by another factor, of course. my father was in the military and we, like the other american families, were occupying their island.

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by amerikanized
    as a teenager, i lived in okinawa for a few years. i saw the subtle hostility directed against the american servicemen and their families. while it was disturbing to witness, it was somewhat gratifying, too. i'm japanese-american and was raised in the southern united states. this reverse descrimination was novel, to say the least. however, a part of me still empathized with them...after all, i'm american, too.

    the okinawans' resentment may have been perpetuated by another factor, of course. my father was in the military and we, like the other american families, were occupying their island.
    I lived in Okinawa too...there are too many military people sometimes but if it wasn't for them helping with the local economy then it might be worse.

  17. #92
    Cute and Furry Ewok85's Avatar
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    The original reason countries didnt like it was that by having dual citizenship you were nolonger loyal to your country, being unpatriotic and all that bull.

  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ewok85
    The original reason countries didnt like it was that by having dual citizenship you were nolonger loyal to your country, being unpatriotic and all that bull.
    But what spoiled it was the tax evasion and rich people

  19. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buddha Smoker
    I lived in Okinawa too...there are too many military people sometimes but if it wasn't for them helping with the local economy then it might be worse.
    their economy would certainly be worse, but their standard of living would fare about the same. i remember the okinawans being primarily farmers and fishermen. regardless, they'll tolerate the servicemen's presence, but will continue to harbor their disdain of americans in general; must be a cultural thing.

  20. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by amerikanized
    their economy would certainly be worse, but their standard of living would fare about the same. i remember the okinawans being primarily farmers and fishermen. regardless, they'll tolerate the servicemen's presence, but will continue to harbor their disdain of americans in general; must be a cultural thing.
    Yes, you are quite right, but it seemed to me that alot of the families monopolized alot of the business in Okinawa and the others got slim-pickings..know what I mean?

  21. #96
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ewok85
    The original reason countries didnt like it was that by having dual citizenship you were nolonger loyal to your country, being unpatriotic and all that bull.
    Then why very patriotic countries like the US allow dual nationality, while countries with very low patriotism like Belgium (where people feel they are from their region, or the EU rather than Belgium) don't ?

  22. #97
    Hi Keiichi's Avatar
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    Maybe it's all part of freedom. "You're free to be a citizen of another country also."
    K1

  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo
    Then why very patriotic countries like the US allow dual nationality, while countries with very low patriotism like Belgium (where people feel they are from their region, or the EU rather than Belgium) don't ?
    Maybe cuz in Belgium since they already have such a low sense of patriotism, if one was to have another citizenship, they might forget about Belgium completely

  24. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buddha Smoker
    Yes, you are quite right, but it seemed to me that alot of the families monopolized alot of the business in Okinawa and the others got slim-pickings..know what I mean?
    <nod> sad, but true

  25. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by amerikanized
    <nod> sad, but true
    Also, I think the Okinawan people complain a lot and don't take the first step in fixing things. The Japanese government spend tons of money but all they do is complain about how the Japanese people hate Okinawa...know what I mean?

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