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Thread: Strange Japanese beliefs & urban myths

  1. #26
    Go to shopping PopCulturePooka's Avatar
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    I found the big company salarymen to be the dumbest, most mind numbingly boring and hygienically appalling of my students.

  2. #27
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FirstHousePooka
    I found the big company salarymen to be the dumbest, most mind numbingly boring and hygienically appalling of my students.
    Did you teach managers, accountants and company presidents or floor-level staff, salespeople and secretaries ?

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  3. #28
    Go to shopping PopCulturePooka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo
    Did you teach managers, accountants and company presidents or floor-level staff, salespeople and secretaries ?
    Accountants can be low level. Thats like a double dose of boring. Also one or two managers.

    IBM system engineers were a big one. Our school was very close to the IBM R&D center so they all came to my NOVA.

    A heart surgeon whose breath smelt like... bad things.

  4. #29
    Banned Mike Cash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo
    Never heard that one before. Is that only nipples ?
    Nope. Labia too.

  5. #30
    Junior Member DoctorP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikecash
    Nope. Labia too.
    I thought it just happened with age...I didn't realize that it was tied to virginity!

  6. #31
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CC1
    I thought it just happened with age...I didn't realize that it was tied to virginity!
    It suppose that skin colour also plays a role.

  7. #32
    Cute and Furry Ewok85's Avatar
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    I've been having some fun discussions with my girlfriend, who it seems accepts whatever she is told as a barefaced fact and thats that.

    She was going on about the high levels of crime in Japan that are carried out by those nasty Korean and Chinese illegals, and that any Japanese person can spot them a mile away! So out comes http://www.alllooksame.com/ and she scored 3/18, which made her listen a bit better as I explained the last 200 years in Asia and the various going ons, covered basic Australian and American history and surprised her on a few points. "Why do the chinese and koreans hate us so much!?" google "nanking massacre" and the Jref news section. No apologies for this, no trials. I've met a few German people and they have always know about their countries past and the evils carried out by the Nazi party, the acknowledge it and are disgusted in the same way I am. But in Japan?...

    Then it dawned on me, all I ever remember being taught in high school in Japan was ancient history in meaningless detail (ie. blow by blow account of the Byzatine empire, zzzz) or Japanese history with no holds barred! ("And what meal was eaten by the 4th Shogun at his 32nd birthday?"). Nothing modern or of any use. And when the often said idea of "Japanese people are unique and all the same" came up I asked "so where did they come from? Ainu? Or perhaps... KOREA?!".

    Now you get an interesting reaction to this kind of statement, I suggest you try it some time. Makes for interesting discussion at the very least.

    Got a few other things, but they can wait a day or so

  8. #33
    Your Goddess is here Ma Cherie's Avatar
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    Since I've been on this forum I was able to gather some insight about misconceptions the japanese have towards the outside world. But the only I want to ask is what's being done to change the mentality? This is all I would like to know.
    "Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot."
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
    by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)

  9. #34
    Regular Member den4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo
    What kind of companies did you teach at (and what level) ? Why would that be a scary thought ? I found people in big Japanese (or Western) companies to be usually better educated than people with a "arubaito" or doing non-intellectual jobs. But even the most educated ones still stick to stereotypes and misconceptions, something that would not normally happen to someone with the same education level in Europe.
    I taught at all sorts of companies in and around the Concrete jungle of Tokyo and the surrounding satellite cities. Since we were basically sent to the client (company) for an in-house Engrish (I mean English) instruction, it went anywhere from average "What is your name?" level to some assistance with translations from Japanese to English, or preparing speeches for clients that were heading out overseas (mostly to US or Canada), or advanced level conversation debate classes to ensure the clients' level of English did not deteriorate once they returned to their regular jobs once again.
    Yes, you are very correct that even the advanced level folks held certain stereotypes and misconceptions, but usually they were of a level to debate the validity of such notions amongst each other, so that tended to be a plus.
    I rarely taught children's level stuff, since most of our clients were in large companies...although I do recall having to test potential clients once at a company, and when the student went into a state near catatonic panic at having to speak in English, that tended to be somewhat "disturbing."

    Why is it scary? Well, I figure it is frightening that you probably had to go through the same sort of nonsense I had to at those types of corporation-as-client classes.....and so, I can understand why you pose the questions that you do.....
    I could be way off base, of course, but from the nature of most of your commentaries, I suspect I'm not too far off the mark....
    I know nothing...except the answer is 42. You know more than I do.

  10. #35
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ma Cherie
    Since I've been on this forum I was able to gather some insight about misconceptions the japanese have towards the outside world. But the only I want to ask is what's being done to change the mentality? This is all I would like to know.
    If something was being done, I would not be complaining so much about it. I am sometimes appalled to see that many Japanese know very well how poor and dysfunctional their education system is. The news tell them all the time. The Japanese are the world's 3rd worst performers in TOEFL (=English language) tests, they are among the worst at learning languages in general, they cannot debate, lack critical sense, have an almost inexistent knowledge of geography, geopolitics and world history. But I haven't heard that the government was going to tackle any of these issues (well yes, I heard about 2 years ago that they wanted to introduce "debate classes" but haven't heard it had been approved).

    Anyway, the wrong has already been done. All the people above the age of 17 will not benefit from any changes to come, so that most of the active population will remain basically ignorant of the world and bad at speaking languages or thinking by themselves for at least 2 more generations (as people who are 20 now will still be working in 40 years from now, and the 6-year old now will only start working in 15-20 years from now).

  11. #36
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by den4
    Why is it scary? Well, I figure it is frightening that you probably had to go through the same sort of nonsense I had to at those types of corporation-as-client classes.....and so, I can understand why you pose the questions that you do.....
    I could be way off base, of course, but from the nature of most of your commentaries, I suspect I'm not too far off the mark....
    I think we had a similar work experience, and heard similar nonsense then. I have to say that a few of my students are really interesting and more "world-aware" than average. But they are exceptions, peope who have actually lived abroad and are very interested in at least one particular country (eg. the UK or the USA), or who frequently travel to Western countries for research purposes (for their job). Some less tarvelled people are also more careful in their questions and do not ask dumb questions. I'd say that only about 3/4 of the people I have met ask dumb questions (which is a lot, but leaves a good 1/4). But rare are the people who have never been to Europe or America (apart from Hawaii), who do not have strong misconceptions (even if they have been to Asian countries).

  12. #37
    Regular Member den4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo
    If something was being done, I would not be complaining so much about it. I am sometimes appalled to see that many Japanese know very well how poor and dysfunctional their education system is. The news tell them all the time. The Japanese are the world's 3rd worst performers in TOEFL (=English language) tests, they are among the worst at learning languages in general, they cannot debate, lack critical sense, have an almost inexistent knowledge of geography, geopolitics and world history. But I haven't heard that the government was going to tackle any of these issues (well yes, I heard about 2 years ago that they wanted to introduce "debate classes" but haven't heard it had been approved).

    Anyway, the wrong has already been done. All the people above the age of 17 will not benefit from any changes to come, so that most of the active population will remain basically ignorant of the world and bad at speaking languages or thinking by themselves for at least 2 more generations (as people who are 20 now will still be working in 40 years from now, and the 6-year old now will only start working in 15-20 years from now).
    You are right about the debate aspect of their education. When confronted in a debate fashion, very few people (students included) had any effective reasons they could offer in response to a challenge. Many that did offer an opinion used old, outdated misconceptions or cliched information that did nothing to better their arguments. I found the best way to get them out of this mode of thinking was to get them into an izakaya or pub, where, partially inebriated, they were less guarded of their opinions and more open about their personal thoughts. Having done this, of course, led to much amusing conversations about other more in depth misconceptions, but their opinions were not so filled with stock answers they are used to using in the classroom.

    About the only way I have seen where the folks got rid of their misconceptions was to actually live in another country for a number of years. But like you have mentioned, even this doesn't always work....

  13. #38
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    Now Maciamo, you seem to think that this stupidity is an inherant (or maybe learned) Japanese trait, but I'd say it's more just a simple case of ignorance and misinformation. People that ask you such questions most likely have had limited contact with the world outside of Japan and are just spouting off the rediculous things they've been taught. This happens the world round though, the Japanese are not "uniquely" stupid.

    You say that you've observed this behavior in both Japanese people that have traveled abroad and those that haven't. Well in my experience, Japanese that have lived abroad don't make such stupid generalizations. Maybe if they've just gone to another country on business and haven't really had a chance to actually experience the culture then they'd come out of the situation with little effect to their opinions based on misinformation spoon-fed to them by Japanese media and schools, but if they've lived there for a significant period of time this isn't really the case. Talk to some people that have done a study abroad or have lived/worked abroad and you'll get much more reasonable responses to these questions. You can avoid cultural interaction if you're only there for a week or 2, especially if bogged down with meetings and work, but if you live there for any signifigant amount of time (even just a few months) you can't.

    Also, ignorance of international affairs isn't specific to any one region of the world. I've heard some pretty stupid questions about Japan from Americans around me, and some equally rediculous and sweeping generalizations about places outside of America. I think something like 2/3 of Americans don't even have a passport, and a similar proportion probably couldn't point out Afghanistan or Iraq on a world map, even though Bush has sent troops to both of these places in the past 5 years! If you've ever talked to anyone from China or North Korea, you'd know about all the crazy things their government and media feeds them... it could be worse, believe me.

    Finally, people know details about things they care about. I'm interested in Japan so I know the language and many cultural peculiarities, but I probably don't know things about Europe that you'd consider general knowledge because frankly, I'm just not interested. If a Japanese person isn't interested in the US, then I wouldn't be surprised if they ask me some stupid question like whether I have a gun or if everyone I know goes to church. The more interested they are, the more I would expect them to research such things and come up with informed opinions.

  14. #39
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darg
    People that ask you such questions most likely have had limited contact with the world outside of Japan and are just spouting off the rediculous things they've been taught. This happens the world round though, the Japanese are not "uniquely" stupid.
    This thread is a bit old. Have you read this one on the same topic ?

    I am sorry, but I have lived in 6 countries and travelled to over 40, and I don't think this kind of misconceptions are so common "the world round". Certainly not where I come from.

    You say that you've observed this behavior in both Japanese people that have traveled abroad and those that haven't. Well in my experience, Japanese that have lived abroad don't make such stupid generalizations. Maybe if they've just gone to another country on business and haven't really had a chance to actually experience the culture then they'd come out of the situation with little effect to their opinions based on misinformation spoon-fed to them by Japanese media and schools, but if they've lived there for a significant period of time this isn't really the case.
    You shouldn't need to travel a lot or actually live in a country to know the basic things I mentioned in the article in link above. As you said misinformation is "spoon-fed to them by Japanese media and schools". I have nothing against the people who say such stupid things. I am just angry at how institutionalised such misconceptions and prejudices are in Japan. As I mentioned in the article in link, I think this has a connection with the government trying to subtly instil the ideas of nihonjinron into the minds of the masses. And unfortunately, they have succeeded brilliantly. As a result, most Japanese are utterly lost and surprised when they go abroad, and if they don't, they somehow feel that Japan is culturally or morally superior to the rest of the world.

    I've heard some pretty stupid questions about Japan from Americans around me, and some equally rediculous and sweeping generalizations about places outside of America. I think something like 2/3 of Americans don't even have a passport, and a similar proportion probably couldn't point out Afghanistan or Iraq on a world map, even though Bush has sent troops to both of these places in the past 5 years! If you've ever talked to anyone from China or North Korea, you'd know about all the crazy things their government and media feeds them... it could be worse, believe me.
    I am a bit tired of saying this, but Americans are apperently worse than the Japanese. My reference is Europe, not the US. I could start criticising American people for being ignorant of the world too, but this website is dedicated to Japan, and I haven't got enough experience of the US to find the root of the problem. What's more, people in the US are very mixed and there are huge differences in knowledge of the world between the people, while it is much more uniformous in Japan. It seems clear that the problem in Japan stems from the government,who misinform its citizens through the education and media on purpose, for the reasons I mentioned in the article in link.

    [quoyte]Finally, people know details about things they care about. I'm interested in Japan so I know the language and many cultural peculiarities, but I probably don't know things about Europe that you'd consider general knowledge because frankly, I'm just not interested. If a Japanese person isn't interested in the US, then I wouldn't be surprised if they ask me some stupid question like whether I have a gun or if everyone I know goes to church. The more interested they are, the more I would expect them to research such things and come up with informed opinions.[/QUOTE]

    This is true, but I think there is a minimum knowledge that should be taught by the compulsory education system. This includes, in geography, the name, capitals and flags of every countries in the world (of course, some change with time, but if they could at least recognise those they have learnt), knowing about the different types of climates and riughly where they are found (so as not to think that France is tropical and Congo is temperate ). If you disagree (or other Americans on this forum), then that is the difference of cultural values between me (a North-Western European) and you (an US citizen).

    I have been raised like that, and can't understand how people could graduate even from highschool without this basic knowledge (+ the basics of history, sciences, languages, maths, etc.). I have been told that secondary education was designed in a way so that any student completing highschool should be able to choose any subject at university. But the education system I followed was probably stricter than in most countries in the world. Some will call it elitist, but for me it is just standard (and everything that is less good is therefore inferior). The funniest thing is that I found my education system to be already too easy and primitive, and only hoped to be taught some more serious stuff, but I know that not everybody share my craving for knowledge, so the current system should suffice for ordinary people.

    It is sad that some other developed countries like the US and Japan have such low academic requirements. That fosters leaders ignorant of history and geopolitics like GW Bush that can only be seen with contempt by the rest of the world.

  15. #40
    Junior Member YAMA's Avatar
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    Hi, I'm new to this Forum. I'm a Japanese who live in Australia.
    I think when Japanese people ask Europeans if they have four seasons in Europe, they just wanted to break the ice.
    It is true we taught at school that our country is a beautiful country which has four distinguish seasons.
    But it doesn't mean that we've been taught "No other counties have four seasons like we have in Japan. "
    Some Japanese people(like myself) pretend to be naive when they speak to foreigners because they are not confident to carry on a complicated conversation in English.

  16. #41
    Chukchi Salmon lexico's Avatar
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    Talking Welcome to the forum, Yama-san !

    You've found the forum's hottest thread on you first post. Are you into stocks or lottery by any chance ?
    Quote Originally Posted by YAMA
    when Japanese people ask Europeans if they have four seasons in Europe, they just wanted to break the ice.
    Your example can be compared to the British comment on weather, or the French, Italian, Spanish, German or American reference to "it." It can be a million different things, but the first thing that comes to mind in the langauges (if anyone cared to think about what "it" meant) is weather/climate. Comment ca va, Buon giorno, Buenos diez, Guten tag, How is it going, Nice day ! The expressiong "I'm having a bad day" can also be argued as a metaphor springing from the original reference to the day's weather. I couldn't agree with you more on the "ice breaker." It would be unfortunate to take it as a pride-wielding, snobbish ice-pick. Who in their right minds would be that dumb or senile ?
    Quote Originally Posted by YAMA
    It is true we taught at school that our country is a beautiful country which has four distinguish seasons. But it doesn't mean that we've been taught "No other counties have four seasons like we have in Japan."
    This is also true in Korea. Don't all countries do that to a degree ? How about China, Taiwan, Mongolia, Turkey, Serbia, Bulgaria, Macedonia, or Greece ?
    Quote Originally Posted by YAMA
    Some Japanese people(like myself) pretend to be naive when they speak to foreigners because they are not confident to carry on a complicated conversation in English.
    I think many refined cultures have in essence the same way of assuming ignorance. One wishes not to be pretending to know just because one has read a few lines in a book. How much can you trust a book ? The personal contact is highly valued in such sophisticated cultures, so it doesn't count if you knew anything beforehand. It becomes special knowledge only because the person you met told you "in person." It is also more scientific to ask a person from the country, rather than believing whatever's in the book. That's what I think ... although some from a less sophisticated culture may choose to disagree ... *feigning ignorance*

    Nevertheless, there seems to be a small number of obstinate, prejudiced, supremacist, condescending individuals in any society, not only in Japan. Does anyone have an objective, numerical breakdown on "bigots statistics found worldwide by country/nationality/ethnic group/language group ?" I would be highly interested in examining such a list of reliable statistics.

    That aside: Welcome to the forum, again, Yama-san !
    Knowing that Australia is in the southern hemisphere, but not wanting to pretend to know anything about it without ever having set foot in your country of residence, if I may be so bold as to ask you:

    "Are you having fair weather in your country ?"
    "Are your four seasons exactly the same as what you've had in Japan ?"
    "When does your spring, summer, autumn, and fall begin and end ?"
    "Have you experienced snow in Australia ?"
    "Have you noticed what might be related to global warming recently ?"
    "How is it going with you ?"
    Last edited by lexico; Mar 25, 2005 at 23:11.
    Z: The fish in the water are happy.
    H: How do you know ? You're not fish.
    Z: How do you know I don't ? You're not me.
    H: True I am not you, and I cannot know. Likewise, I know you're not, therefore I know you don't.
    Z: You asked me how I knew implying you knew I knew. In fact I saw some fish, strolling down by the Hao River, all jolly and gay.

    --Zhuangzi

  17. #42
    Junior Member YAMA's Avatar
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    Thank you for your reply, Lexico-san.

    Befere I came to this forum, I have never imagined that asking "Do you have four seasons in your country?" is so offensive to some Western people.
    I myself usually ask this question to foreigners. Most of the time, it is for ice breaker, but sometimes I really have no idea about their climate when I speak to people from countries such as Sudan or Lebanon.

    I think the Japanese people feel the same sort of offense when asked
    "Do you eat raw fish?" with a superior smile from Western people.

    Fortunately, I have never asked this question in Australia, but when I traveled to Germany, I was asked this question and I was a little bit upset.

    Anyway,I agree that we have to know more about other countries.

    Lexico-san
    "Are you having fair weather in your country ?"
    Yes, we are.I love the sub-tropical climate in Brisbane.But sometimes it is too warm to me.
    "Are your four seasons exactly the same as what you've had in Japan ?"
    I arrived in here just 1month ago, so I can't say.But summer is similar to that of Tokyo's.
    "When does your spring, summer, autumn, and fall begin and end ?"
    Spring,Sep-Nov Summer,Dec-Feb,Autumn, Mar-may,Winter,Jun-Aug
    It supposed to be Autumn now, but it's still hot.30ŽI
    Have you experienced snow in Australia ?"
    Not yet.Maybe it will never snows in BNE.
    "Have you noticed what might be related to global warming recently ?"
    Before I came here I was in Melbourne,one day the maximum temperature dropped down to 13degrees in the middle of summer. I think something is going wrong in global weather system.
    "How is it going with you ?"
    I'm enjyoying my stay in Australia.Wonderful country!

  18. #43
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YAMA
    I think when Japanese people ask Europeans if they have four seasons in Europe, they just wanted to break the ice.
    Quote Originally Posted by lexico
    I couldn't agree with you more on the "ice breaker." It would be unfortunate to take it as a pride-wielding, snobbish ice-pick. Who in their right minds would be that dumb or senile ?
    This was not the impression I had, as I was not usually asked this question at the beginning of a conversation, but maybe after talking for 30 minutes. It was almost never at the first meeting, but sometimes after a few months I had known the person (more often within the first 5 times I met those people though).

    Quote Originally Posted by YAMA
    But it doesn't mean that we've been taught "No other counties have four seasons like we have in Japan. "
    Funny because some Japanese (few, but yet), actually told me that they were told that only Japan had four seasons. Probably among less educated people, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by lexico
    I think many refined cultures have in essence the same way of assuming ignorance. One wishes not to be pretending to know just because one has read a few lines in a book. How much can you trust a book ? The personal contact is highly valued in such sophisticated cultures, so it doesn't count if you knew anything beforehand.
    Do you mean that one cannot trust books about climates found around the world ? One cannot trust pictures of trees blossoming in spring, hot summers on the beach, red and yellow autumn leaves and snow in winter as you find in any travel book or brochures. Give me a break, will you! I have never been to China but I have seen plenty of pictures of the seasons. What's more with all those Western movies showing in Japan, it is just impossible not to know that Europe or the US also have clearly distinct seasons with about all the features found in Japan. I don't mind if they asked if there were cherry or plum blossoms in my country, but seasons ??

    Quote Originally Posted by lexico
    "Are you having fair weather in your country ?"
    "Are your four seasons exactly the same as what you've had in Japan ?"
    "When does your spring, summer, autumn, and fall begin and end ?"
    "Have you experienced snow in Australia ?"
    "Have you noticed what might be related to global warming recently ?"
    Australia is a huge country (almost twice bigger than the European Union), and most of it lies within the tropics. Therefore the weather will depend a lot on where Yama-san is staying. But you can reasonably guess than if he is staying in a tropical humid area like the north coast or subtropical like the north-east coast, it will be hot and humid, while if he is in the mediterean area (Perth, Adelaide, Sydney...), it will be autumn at this time of the year, although probably a bit warmer than in Japan. In Tasmania however, where the weather is cold temperate (just junior highschool knowledge), he might experience some weather more similar to most of Japan (including snow in winter).

    Anyway, I was not asked any detailed questions about the European climate by any Japanese who asked me about the seasons. They mostly want to know if "my country has 4 seasons", then I have to explain that yes it does, and which region of Japan it is more similar to.

  19. #44
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YAMA
    I myself usually ask this question to foreigners. Most of the time, it is for ice breaker, but sometimes I really have no idea about their climate when I speak to people from countries such as Sudan or Lebanon.
    First you say you ask this to Westerners, the you talk about Sudan and Lebanon. Anyway, it seems obvious to anybody who has seen a world map that Sudan is hot almost all year round (being partly in the Sahara desert) and Lebanon is forcedly mediteranean, as it is on the Mediteranean Sea.

    I think the Japanese people feel the same sort of offense when asked
    "Do you eat raw fish?" with a superior smile from Western people.
    ?? Where you asked if you eat raw fish by Westerners ? Do you mean, after you asked them if they can eat it and they said yes ?

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maciamo
    First you say you ask this to Westerners, the you talk about Sudan and Lebanon. Anyway, it seems obvious to anybody who has seen a world map that Sudan is hot almost all year round (being partly in the Sahara desert) and Lebanon is forcedly mediteranean, as it is on the Mediteranean Sea.



    ?? Where you asked if you eat raw fish by Westerners ? Do you mean, after you asked them if they can eat it and they said yes ?
    I think he wrote that he ased this of 'foreigners', not 'Westerners'. In regards to geography, I think Maciamo that you are pre-supposing too much about what others may or may not find obvious when looking at maps.

    Asking non-Japanese about raw fish is justifiable I think, since eating raw fish is relatively rare outside Japan, especially Europe, Australia or the US.

  21. #46
    Junior Member YAMA's Avatar
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    Maciamo-san, hajimemashite. Comment allez vous?

    Funny because some Japanese (few, but yet), actually told me that they were told that only Japan had four seasons. Probably among less educated people, though.
    I agree with you that "a few" Japanese believe that "ONLY" Japan has four seasons.
    And I would like you to know that majority of the Japanese do not think Japan is the "ONLY"country which has four seasons.
    Please, believe me!

    Hello, DZIENDOBRY Index-san.

    Asking non-Japanese about raw fish is justifiable I think, since eating raw fish is relatively rare outside Japan, especially Europe, Australia or the US.
    Yes, I Know. Most of the time they just don't know about our food culture.May be I am a little bit persecution mania, but sometimes I sense a sort of sneer.(Eat raw fish? What a barbarian!)

    Here in Brisbane, you can find sushi takeaway shops everywhere. And sushi rolls are very popular among Aussies.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by YAMA

    Hello, DZIENDOBRY Index-san.



    Yes, I Know. Most of the time they just don't know about our food culture.May be I am a little bit persecution mania, but sometimes I sense a sort of sneer.(Eat raw fish? What a barbarian!)

    Here in Brisbane, you can find sushi takeaway shops everywhere. And sushi rolls are very popular among Aussies.
    I'm moving to the Gold Coast in May so I hope there are some good sushi restaurants!

  23. #48
    Junior Member YAMA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Index
    I'm moving to the Gold Coast in May so I hope there are some good sushi restaurants!
    Are you coming to Gold Coast?
    I've been there only once, but there are a lot of Japanese restrants there.
    Even you can find a raamen noodles restaurant.

    Lamington National Park near Gold Coast is good for trecking.
    I went there yesterday.

  24. #49
    Go to shopping PopCulturePooka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YAMA

    Here in Brisbane, you can find sushi takeaway shops everywhere. And sushi rolls are very popular among Aussies.
    But those sushi rolls here aren't very good at all!

    Haha and the katsudon is TERRIBLE!

  25. #50
    Regular Member cicatriz esp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Index

    Asking non-Japanese about raw fish is justifiable I think, since eating raw fish is relatively rare outside Japan, especially Europe, Australia or the US.
    Ceviche, prepared in central and South America for hundreds of years.

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