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Thread: Do the Chinese understand Pin Yin?

  1. #1
    Banned justin9213's Avatar
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    Do the Chinese understand Pin Yin?

    Do the Chinese understand Pin Yin? Is it easyier than english? Does it have the same feeling as if it was wrriten in chinese?

  2. #2
    Resident Realist nice gaijin's Avatar
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    hanzi conveys meaning, whereas pinyin just tells pronunciation and intonation. My understanding is that pinyin is a learning aid for students of Chinese that understand the English alphabet, and is not necessary for native speakers to learn. I'd guess that it's along the same lines as romaji for Japanese; even if they can read it, it has none of the history or meaning behind it.

  3. #3
    Seeing is believing Minty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nice gaijin
    hanzi conveys meaning, whereas pinyin just tells pronunciation and intonation. My understanding is that pinyin is a learning aid for students of Chinese that understand the English alphabet, and is not necessary for native speakers to learn. I'd guess that it's along the same lines as romaji for Japanese; even if they can read it, it has none of the history or meaning behind it.
    Actually native speakers do learn pin yin. Chinese people in China, Malaysia and Singapore learn the pin yin in Roman alphabet but Taiwan still keep the traditional pin yin writings, it kind of looks like katakana or something. I never learnt that version of pin yin I only know the roman letter ones because I learnt my Chinese in Malaysia before I migrated to Australia. Not sure about HK though.

  4. #4
    Happy 4321go's Avatar
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    Pin Yin is just a tool to learn the language~ It is the basic skill for the learner,both for native and nonnative~

  5. #5
    Resident Realist nice gaijin's Avatar
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    Oh yes, a Malaysian friend of mine once showed me the pronunciation key used in Taiwan. I wasn't aware that native speakers used the roman characters during study, but I suppose it makes sense. Once a character's proper pronunciation is learned, however, do native speakers ever use pin yin for the character again? It seems like it would be counter-productive, unless pin yin is the input method for Chinese, like romaji for Japanese.

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    Tubthumper JimmySeal's Avatar
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    I know that pinyin is widely used in Singapore. People there probably understand it better than most students of Chinese, and definitely better than most Japanese people understand romaji.

    In Taiwan they use phonetic characters (bo po mo fo, I forget the technical term for them), so they probably don't know pinyin as well there.

  7. #7
    Seeing is believing Minty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nice gaijin
    Oh yes, a Malaysian friend of mine once showed me the pronunciation key used in Taiwan. I wasn't aware that native speakers used the roman characters during study, but I suppose it makes sense. Once a character's proper pronunciation is learned, however, do native speakers ever use pin yin for the character again? It seems like it would be counter-productive, unless pin yin is the input method for Chinese, like romaji for Japanese.
    Yes, pin yin can be used to find the Chinese characters in order to type Chinese fonts on computers. It can also be used to find words in computerize dictionaries or dictionaries.

  8. #8
    Seeing is believing Minty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmySeal
    I know that pinyin is widely used in Singapore. People there probably understand it better than most students of Chinese, and definitely better than most Japanese people understand romaji.
    In Taiwan they use phonetic characters (bo po mo fo, I forget the technical term for them), so they probably don't know pinyin as well there.
    Bo po mo fo are pin yin but they are the traditional font of the pin yin system, the Taiwanese seem like the only one left that still use that. China, Malaysia and Singapore have all decided to use the new Roman pin yin font. No sure about Hong Kong.

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    Traveler of eternity dreamer's Avatar
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    I thought pin yin was the most used input method used in china? Am I wrong?
    One of the most adventurous things left for us is to go to bed. For no one can lay a hand on our dreams....

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    Banned justin9213's Avatar
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    What is the new pinyin font?

  11. #11
    Resident Realist nice gaijin's Avatar
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    If you're referring to the "new Roman pin yin font" Minty mentioned, I think she's referring to the alphabet with diacritical marks (over the characters) as opposed to the traditional syllabary used in Taiwan.

  12. #12
    Banned justin9213's Avatar
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    So they dont use Ni3 hao3 anymore?
    They use nǐ hǎo?
    What if you cant type alphabet with diacritical marks on your computer?

  13. #13
    Banned osias's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmySeal
    I know that pinyin is widely used in Singapore. People there probably understand it better than most students of Chinese, and definitely better than most Japanese people understand romaji.
    In Taiwan they use phonetic characters (bo po mo fo, I forget the technical term for them), so they probably don't know pinyin as well there.
    bo po mo fo is called ’‰Ή•„εj.

  14. #14
    alalala huayue's Avatar
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    sure,you know in china every primary students must learn PinYin ,its a foundation to study chineseXD

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    Pinyin is not difficult if you have a native pronouncing them for you. It's quite straight forward. Also, you can guess the pinyin of certain characters just by looking at certain components of the characters. Tones are always harder to guess.

  16. #16
    Junior Member bilicon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minty
    Actually native speakers do learn pin yin. Chinese people in China, Malaysia and Singapore learn the pin yin in Roman alphabet but Taiwan still keep the traditional pin yin writings, it kind of looks like katakana or something. I never learnt that version of pin yin I only know the roman letter ones because I learnt my Chinese in Malaysia before I migrated to Australia. Not sure about HK though.
    Yeah, mandarin is more and more popular in HK now. And some of my Hk friends tell me that they also use pinyin. And some of them even use pinyin to type simplified chinese.


    And i also wanna tell you guys that, pinyin is very important in china. It almost of of han people know pinyin, because when we are in elementary school, we all need to learn pinyin.

  17. #17
    Regular Member Gaijinian's Avatar
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    I wish Taiwan used Roman Pinyin.... I'm too lazy to learn Zhuyin Fuhao. I Taiwanese dude tried to teach it to me, but ai, ang, e, a... all sound so similar... And it really makes Romanization of words crazy...
    Like, 新, quite similar to Japanese シン with a high tone, is Romanized as Hsin... I think in pinyin it is Xin1.
    http://en.hccg.gov.tw/
    That city is pronunced like シンズ... Hsinchu? なんで?
    ‚±‚κ‚©‚η‚ΰβ‘ΞŠζ’£‚ι`

  18. #18
    Regular Member Supervin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaijinian
    I wish Taiwan used Roman Pinyin.... I'm too lazy to learn Zhuyin Fuhao. I Taiwanese dude tried to teach it to me, but ai, ang, e, a... all sound so similar... And it really makes Romanization of words crazy...
    Yes, it's quite a pity - things would've been standardized throughout China and Taiwan had the latter decided to adopt Hanyu Pinyin, the mainstream form of Pinyin nowadays. Since Hanyu Pinyin was invented by China, for political reasons, Taiwan has always rejected the idea of using it.

    At least (for one) in recent years, Taipei has adopted Hanyu Pinyin through Ma Ying-jeou's insistence. The rather awkward traditional Pinyin system that can be seen all over Taiwan even today is called Wade-Giles - e.g. Zhong Xiao East Road (Hanyu) is written as Chung Hsiao East Road (Wade-Giles).

    However, despite the rejection of the mainstream Pinyin, Taiwan has come up with a somewhat similar Pinyin system to Hanyu, called Tongyong Pinyin. This one's at least more easily convertible for those proficient in Hanyu Pinyin - using Tongyong, the above example would become Jhong Siao East Road. Its widespread use remains to be seen though.

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    I love pin ying

    I love PIN YING since without it I would never input Chinese words so quickly and easily as now.The man who invented PIN YING must be a genius!
    By the way,although PIN YING has great advantage,it still can not replace the Chinese Words.

  20. #20
    Regular Member Supervin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yzxmw
    I love PIN YING since without it I would never input Chinese words so quickly and easily as now.
    What imput method did you use in the past? Apparently Cangjie is really popular and so is Wubi, especially in Chinese speaking areas where pinyin hasn't been adopted.

  21. #21
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    indeed , pin yin is used in china since 1949
    but it is not that case in taiwan and hongkong
    pin yin is just a tool to learn chinese
    since i was a kid ,i learned chinese using pin yin
    if you read pin yin,you may think it is like english or some other languages in EU
    but chinese will never ever be replaced by pin yin
    because yin pin never shows any beautiful sense
    but hanzi ,the chinese charactors , has a beautil handwriting figure
    it is a kind of culture in the long history in china which can originated one thousand years ago or more

  22. #22
    Ah Ben
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    yeah, couldn't agree more with –n‰Ζ传l.But also thanks to Pin Yin, othervise it's not this easy for us lazy ppl to input Chinese font so freely, I haven't study Wubi yet, find it so difficult, should remember so many thing by heart. Hope 1 day can use Wubi lah, bcoz it's faster to input chinese font if master in Wubi.

  23. #23
    Regular Member Another Aoi Fan's Avatar
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    I think Pingying is used mostly by and for people who speak English... and know how to speak chinese. Its a form of writing, specificly. I dont think its used in Hong Kong..
    GAZEROCK IS NOT DEAD!


  24. #24
    Tortoise Lover Nicholas Tse's Avatar
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    Angry

    “‚lαc‘R˜πpinyin啦﹗œ”ρŒWgΤlh!
    of course chinese know pinyin! except those "banana man"!
    ------
    At least I can be called as special, at worst, I am just weird!
    ------

  25. #25
    Tortoise Lover Nicholas Tse's Avatar
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    Thumbs down

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Tse View Post
    “‚lαc‘R˜πpinyin啦﹗œ”ρŒWgΤlh!
    of course chinese know pinyin! except those "banana man"!
    gΤlh=Ž―u‰p•Ά﹐šIŽ―u’†•Ά“I“‚l﹗Šˆΰ gŠO黃內”’h﹗
    "banana man"=Chinese that only knows how to speak english and does not know how to speak chinese!Same as banana! Yellow on the outside but White is inside!

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