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  1. #1
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Question Japanese milk preservation

    I noticed on a bottle of milk here in Belgium today that the "best before date" was 14 April, i.e. in 3 months' time. I was shocked as I clearly remember that the cartons of milk I bought in Tokyo usually expired within a week, and if bought in combinis often with 2 or 3 days. Is that because Japanese milk is not pasteurised or not heated at high temperature ?

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  2. #2
    Robot/Ninja xerxes99's Avatar
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    I think you've got it exactly Maciamo.
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  3. #3
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    Don't know about Japanese milk, but it is the same here too, milk in carton expires in 1-2 weeks or so and it is pasteurised.

  4. #4
    Regular Member ullvarg's Avatar
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    actually in most european countries you can choose witch kind you want the standard 3days-1week, or you can buy the one you bought with is pumped full with preservation chemicals so it lasts a couple of months. BTW lidel only sell chemically preserved milk, so if you want to stay natural keep away from them.

  5. #5
    Banned Mike Cash's Avatar
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    This prompted a visit to the fridge......

    Our current carton of Japanese milk indicates that it has been heated to 130 degrees for two seconds. It also says that it has been preserved according to the "ESL" method to extend the 賞味期限. It doesn't say what the "ESL" method is, and I don't have time to research it at the moment. I'm guessing that "ESL" may mean "Extended Shelf Life". The expiration date on this carton of milk is January 27th, and I doubt that it was bought more than a day or two ago.

  6. #6
    Hullu RockLee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikecash
    This prompted a visit to the fridge......

    Our current carton of Japanese milk indicates that it has been heated to 130 degrees for two seconds. It also says that it has been preserved according to the "ESL" method to extend the ܖ. It doesn't say what the "ESL" method is, and I don't have time to research it at the moment. I'm guessing that "ESL" may mean "Extended Shelf Life". The expiration date on this carton of milk is January 27th, and I doubt that it was bought more than a day or two ago.
    Correct.

    UHT (Ultra High Temperature)

    UHT is a flash-heating-and-cooling sterilisation process that allows food to retain its nutritional value while preserving natural taste, colour and flavour. The right combination of temperature and time is what UHT is all about. No chemicals, preservatives, microwaves, or any type of radiation are ever used. UHT milk is heated to a temperature between 135 and 150 degrees Celsius for a minimum of one second.

    UHT treatment is used to achieve food sterility. Combined with aseptic packaging, it delivers shelf stable conditions for food. Shelf stable products do not require refrigeration. This saves on transportation and storage costs. Natural resources are also saved by reducing green-house gas emissions.

    There are many products that can benefit from UHT technology. Some examples: milk, cream, juice and soy-based products.

    ESL (Extended Shelf Life)


    ESL milk is quite different from well-known UHT milk. UHT milk is heated to a temperature between 135 and 150 degrees Celsius for a minimum of one second. ESL milk is only heated to a temperature between 85 and 127 degrees Celsius for a minimum of two seconds.

    ESL milk can be stored for up to 21 days and it is as nourishing as pasteurised milk. But be careful, the longer shelf life is based on the package not being opened and that it is refrigerated.

    Source : tetrapack site
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  7. #7
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    im wondering, how does a japanese milk carton looks like from all sides?

  8. #8
    Banned Mike Cash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayern
    im wondering, how does a japanese milk carton looks like from all sides?
    Like an American milk carton, minus pictures of missing children.

  9. #9
    Horizon Rider Kinsao's Avatar
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    UHT milk tastes different from the regular pasteurised milk, though. I can always taste the difference. I don't like UHT milk flavour!

  10. #10
    Offender of all religions Emoni's Avatar
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    This is actually a very good thread. The milk differences were something I noticed right away when I got here. I have to say I prefer Japanese UHT (if I i'm correct) milk to American milk. More natural tasting. And as you know, there is nothing better than getting more and more close to that natural feeling of going down on a cow and going to town on them teets...

    Ahem, anyway. The only thing I noticed that a lot of Americans have problems with is the strong smell that almost seems like it has already gone bad.
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  11. #11
    Twirling dragon Maciamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emoni
    The milk differences were something I noticed right away when I got here. I have to say I prefer Japanese UHT (if I i'm correct) milk to American milk.
    Do you mean Japanese ESL milk ? I haven't seen UHT milk in Japan.

  12. #12
    TAN Hiroyuki Nagashima's Avatar
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    I am confused@
    I hear that it is the UHT milk mainstream in Japan.
    http://www1.jca.apc.org/kyusyoku/foods/milk/data2.htm
    Is the problem here a problem of a display of (A) quality maintenance term and (B) consumption term?
    A:ܖ
    B:

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