Wa-pedia Home > Japan Forum & Europe Forum
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 79

Thread: No Japanese credit cards for foreigners ?

  1. #51
    Curmudgeon Hermit Crab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 19, 2008
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenski View Post
    Hermit Crab,
    I understood what you wrote (more receptive vs. guaranteed). I responded only to show to support the fact that it is not guarantee.

    My friend is long over it, but I still think this is a good example.
    I think your constant harping over one particular instance of rejection is adding to the overall impression given on this thread that it is extremely difficult to get a credit card issued to you in Japan. Several posters have given good advice to better your odds. Naturally, there will be difficulties and obstacles to many aspects of our lives, being non-Japanese. Best to accept that, deal with it, and learn what can be done to minimize them. The OP's question "No Japanese credit cards for foreigners" gets a resounding "False!" answer.

  2. #52
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 4, 2005
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenski View Post
    Hermit Crab,
    I understood what you wrote (more receptive vs. guaranteed). I responded only to show to support the fact that it is not guarantee.

    My friend is long over it, but I still think this is a good example.
    Yes, he is a good example.

    owns property
    built his own house
    he has other credit cards
    But nobody knows how financially clean he was at the time of sad rejection.

    I don't know how many times my friends, rich or poor, forgot putting 1 yen more before credit card companies took money out of their banking account.
    I don't know about the financial situation of my friends, 1. to 6. in my last post above, either.

    personal credit information center
    http://www.fcbj.jp/english/index.html
    The center somewhere like the above does not tell him the reason, but disclose his record of transaction upon his request.

  3. #53
    Just me Glenski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location
    Somecity, Japan (American)
    Posts
    80
    Hermit Crab,
    Point taken about bettering your odds. Would you at least accept my point, too, that despite bettering your odds, thee are going to be cases where foreigners will not get a credit card no matter how good your background check looks?

    Pipokun,
    This happened a very short time ago. Don't try to confound the issue with "was he clean back then?" questions.

  4. #54
    Regular Member FrustratedDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 19, 2007
    Location
    Osaka
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by Hermit Crab View Post
    I think your constant harping over one particular instance of rejection is adding to the overall impression given on this thread that it is extremely difficult to get a credit card issued to you in Japan. Several posters have given good advice to better your odds. Naturally, there will be difficulties and obstacles to many aspects of our lives, being non-Japanese. Best to accept that, deal with it, and learn what can be done to minimize them. The OP's question "No Japanese credit cards for foreigners" gets a resounding "False!" answer.
    Unlike what others have posted here, I was told I could not have the card due to be foriegn by the credit card company. And without going into details, I am member of two boards in a companies that I run here. Here is the kicker, if I was to go through my company they said they would approve it straight away instead of using my name only. So it has nothing to do with working for a big company. I also own 500 tsubo's of land and a house, as in I do not have any payments left on it.

    When I was said I wanted it in my name they stated that I could provide a copy of my passport and my permenat residency visa, but it would be very unlikely that the verdict would change. That is when I rang my bank manager and got him to get me the card, but not everyone can do that can they?

  5. #55
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 4, 2005
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenski View Post
    ...
    Pipokun,
    This happened a very short time ago. Don't try to confound the issue with "was he clean back then?" questions.
    The OP, FrustratedDave, and other posters got their cards, so their stories must be good for people in similar situations, but only you know the case of your friend here.
    So all I can do is just a guesswork or to feel sorry for him.

    It is great if he come here to share his stories when he got other cards.

  6. #56
    Regular Member FrustratedDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 19, 2007
    Location
    Osaka
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by pipokun View Post
    The OP, FrustratedDave, and other posters got their cards, so their stories must be good for people in similar situations, but only you know the case of your friend here.
    So all I can do is just a guesswork or to feel sorry for him.

    It is great if he come here to share his stories when he got other cards.
    The thing is that people are not telling the whole story. People who already have cards will find getting them a lot easier. Those who don't will have a difficult time no matter what company you work for.

  7. #57
    Curmudgeon Hermit Crab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 19, 2008
    Posts
    8
    Sure Glenski/FD,

    There are times that you may be rejected regardless of meeting all the regular requirements. It may even be due to having the gall to be foreign and asking to be treated as another human being. Still, with many companies, most of the time, if you take the advice of those who have successfully negotiated the application process, you have a better chance of ending up with a card issued from a Japanese credit company.

    One other point I recall from the translation stint...if you've held the same job for better than a year, your application will be looked on more favorably than someone's who has changed work recently.

  8. #58
    Just me Glenski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location
    Somecity, Japan (American)
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by Hermit Crab View Post
    Still, with many companies, most of the time, if you take the advice of those who have successfully negotiated the application process, you have a better chance of ending up with a card issued from a Japanese credit company.
    Just what the heck is this supposed to mean? What "advice" are you referring to?

    One other point I recall from the translation stint...if you've held the same job for better than a year, your application will be looked on more favorably than someone's who has changed work recently.
    Yup, and my friend was vice-president of his company for almost 20 years.

  9. #59
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 4, 2005
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenski View Post
    ...
    Yup, and my friend was vice-president of his company for almost 20 years.
    I read quite an interesting case that a Japanese medical doctor in his 40, owing his house, feeding his family etc.. was rejected to get a cheap credit card. Of course, he has premium cards.

    The advice (or a guesswork) from a website, "Help! What to do with my application!!!", goes...
    that some credit companies do not always want to issue unnecessary cards which, the companies think, are not supposed to use, esp., when you have already got other cards of the same credit company;
    and that he should not worry about it (the rejection) and should keep using his premium cards.

    If you need the source or other sad and unbelievable stories esp., of Japanese, I am glad to bring it here, but you or your friend can get a practical advice here from FrustratedDave.
    If I were him, I would ask the gas station owner to help me with the card.
    After getting it, I would be glad to join here to share my own story.

  10. #60
    Just me Glenski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location
    Somecity, Japan (American)
    Posts
    80
    pipokun,
    The situation you described does not fit my friend. I already said he contacted the credit card company, and they would not explain why, nor "help". Done deal. Sucks, but done deal.

  11. #61
    Curmudgeon Hermit Crab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 19, 2008
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenski View Post
    Just what the heck is this supposed to mean? What "advice" are you referring to?
    Yup, and my friend was vice-president of his company for almost 20 years.
    Glenski,

    Really...you harp on this single instance of someone not getting a card. Big, fat, hairy deal! We all know people who have been rejected. Personally, I do too. But, I know many more who were successful. Even those who ran their own businesses, were not exactly doing all their taxes and expenses on the up-an-up, let alone their visa issues. Rather than the constant negativity, why not try and give some helpful advice, or go find some if you don't really know.

    The advice I'm referring to is the advice I gave in a couple earlier posts in this thread, as well as advice others have given on other forums and blogs about Japan. Get out there! Do the research! Talk to successful people. Scour the 'Net. Hit the library. Talk to those in the banking and finance industries. Learn how the system works. Learn how to better your odds. If you get one strike, don't throw a hissy fit. Man up. Work harder. Sink or swim. Sounds like you'd rather sink, and then try to b-i-t-c-h about it while the water's filling your lungs. How's that working out for you?!

  12. #62
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 4, 2005
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenski View Post
    pipokun,
    The situation you described does not fit my friend. I already said he contacted the credit card company, and they would not explain why, nor "help". Done deal. Sucks, but done deal.
    What about the case of FrustratedDave?
    His case was about the bank issued credit card and the bank manager helped him.
    I don't know how often your friend goes to the gas station or don't know how much a gas station owner has influence for the credit card issue, though.
    The most visible difference is that FrustratedDave shares his story, but your friend is not here.

    Deeply breath out by sharing other stories of him when he got other cards. Your friend is a very lucky guy with a considerate friend like you.

  13. #63
    Just me Glenski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location
    Somecity, Japan (American)
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by Hermit Crab View Post
    Rather than the constant negativity, why not try and give some helpful advice,
    I've been posting helpful advice on this and half a dozen other forums for more than a decade, thank you. The fact that I point out a piece of reality which is negative (and which people seem to try to find loopholes in, to their dismay) has nothing to do with being "constantly negative". It's reality. I get this type of response whenever I challenge a rose-colored glasses outlook with a heads-up one. Not negative. Reality.

    The advice I'm referring to is the advice I gave in a couple earlier posts in this thread, as well as advice others have given on other forums and blogs about Japan. Get out there! Do the research!
    Why? I'm not the one who got rejected or is asking how to get the card.

    Let's just stop here.

  14. #64
    Non-Member
    Join Date
    Sep 17, 2005
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by FrustratedDave View Post
    Not the case, this trend is accross the board. Did you have a credit card that was in your name that you got while in the states?
    I reread this and thought about this some more. It is not outside the realm of possibility that I still had an American issued credit card when I applied for my first card in Japan, although I have no idea how the financial institution that I applied to would ever have gotten that information. Are you saying that they would know somehow even if one never supplies them with that information?

  15. #65
    Regular Member FrustratedDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 19, 2007
    Location
    Osaka
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikawa Ossan View Post
    I reread this and thought about this some more. It is not outside the realm of possibility that I still had an American issued credit card when I applied for my first card in Japan, although I have no idea how the financial institution that I applied to would ever have gotten that information. Are you saying that they would know somehow even if one never supplies them with that information?
    That is entirely possible as companies can share information. Although in regards to their bigger clients they tend not to share information with each other unless that particular company is in some way affiliated with that company or they have some sort of an aggrement, this stop rival companies taking their business. But with your avergae joe, anything is possible.

  16. #66
    Curmudgeon Hermit Crab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 19, 2008
    Posts
    8
    Don't worry Glenski. You can refer your friend here soon enough.

    From the Aussie/Kiwi Chamber of Commerce Japan homepage:
    Taking the Hassle Out Of the Tax Season in Japan
    GaijinTax.Com


    Japan’s Tax Season is fast approaching, which for many translates into nothing but confusion, uncertainty and unanswered questions. This is particularly true for foreigners who either sign yearly contracts or work for themselves.

    However there is now a website to take some of this hassle and confusion away. GaijinTax.Com’s tagline says it all – “A Foreigner’s Guide to Tax in Japan”. The site is written in plain English and takes users step by step through the various sections in the forms which they need to fill in order to file a tax return in Japan. There are also unofficial English versions of the declaration and expense forms, making it easy for non-Japanese speakers to fill out and then transpose the details onto the official forms. Best of all, it’s FREE!

    Hot on the heels of completing his MBA in Marketing, the site’s creator, Australian Emil Gorgees, is currently working on a project at Ernst & Young (EY) Japan with fellow Australians Dean Page, EY Tax Partner, and Paul Previtera, EY Senior International Tax Manager. Emil explains his motivation for creating the site: “I wanted to make it easier for foreigners to get things done in Japan. I had gone through the same struggles myself and found that the largest issue was the lack of simple, straight forward information in English.”

    The site is still growing with information added daily. “Once this is done, I plan to launch my other project, GaijinMoney.Com, a free site dedicated to showing foreigners in Japan how to apply for credit cards, send money back home, evaluate banking services, and so on” Emil said.

    Tax Returns need to be filed at your local tax office between Monday 16 February - Monday 16 March.

  17. #67
    Just me Glenski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location
    Somecity, Japan (American)
    Posts
    80
    thanks for the site, HC.

    I am interested in both sites, actually, to pass along to others on the teachers' blog I edit here. I wonder how much this guy actually knows, though. He wrote:
    National Health Insurance is also based on your income. For zero income earners, there is a base fee of approximately 7000yen. If you have some form of income, then you must also pay an additional 5% ‘medical levy’. So for someone earning 4,000,000yen/year, expect your health insurance to be about 150,000yen/year.
    Teachers just starting out make about 3 million yen/year, and after their first year here, they pay about twice that in NHI premiums, sometimes more. Maybe he just believes that everyone gets copayments from their employer, which is outright false.

    Still, thanks. I only just opened the file and will continue to read it.

  18. #68
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 6, 2009
    Posts
    2
    Most people I see use cash.
    But what is the advantage of having a credit card?
    Learn to read and write hiragana and katakana using "Learn Those Kana"
    http://code.google.com/p/learn-those-kana/

  19. #69
    Just me Glenski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location
    Somecity, Japan (American)
    Posts
    80
    1. Being able to buy something and pay in installments.
    2. Not having to have cash on you (dangerous).
    3. Not having to risk ATM bandits.
    4. Credit rating for loans.
    5. Ties to frequent flyer mileage or other perks.

  20. #70
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 4, 2005
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenski View Post
    1. Being able to buy something and pay in installments.
    2. Not having to have cash on you (dangerous).
    3. Not having to risk ATM bandits.
    4. Credit rating for loans.
    5. Ties to frequent flyer mileage or other perks.
    Aren't 1. and 4. the cause of greed which they must learn from the present economic turmoil? The credit rating may be a fair system, but isn't it slightly unfair that you need to borrow money or hugely spend above your income to earn it?

  21. #71
    Junior Member japanesewords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 14, 2009
    Posts
    1
    It somewhat depends on how long you have been in Japan and also what company you go with. It's kind of like the States. Once you receive one it gets easier to get others The thing to realize is that your credit history from other countries do not carry over.

  22. #72
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 17, 2009
    Posts
    1
    Hi
    Adding my 3 cents:
    Live here 30 years. From US. After permanent residence less hassle to get cards. And many cancelled as who needs more than one? (From sports clubs, dept stores).

    No point to get US based cards as you have to send payment, one debit-card-like feature of J credit cards I like.

    But Delta says they will stop their Resona VISA card, so I went shopping for new card as my partner uses ANA and that would work to east coast. They give only 70 percent miles for cheaper tickets, but two of their cards give 25 percent bonus, so why not? (wide and gold)

    And they are less restrictive in terms of USING miles (United is either 65,000 or 130,000
    for no restrictions, ANA is 40, 55. 60 thousand depending on season.). And using partner airlines
    is the same 65,000. So while UA Japan card gives full mileage accrual as opposed to ANA, USE is more
    difficult, or so it seems.

    Anyway, applied for GOLD and got told I was ok for WIDE. Actually very little difference. GOLD is a joke
    anyway. Main difference is GOLD costs more and you get a little more insurance. This is for JCB,
    but as I am not sure how useful JCB is in the States, may try VISA, who presumably know me from DELTA. ANA has both.

    Maybe there is a higher limit if I want to buy something on credit or withdraw funds?

    Question I have--they ask for company and I put down one of three at which I work PART TIME. If they had all the companies, which I am unable to write in, they would be able to find my income is more than what I made when i was fully employed at a single company.

    So does anyone know which is better--to write in one company or write in self employed, and then somehow account for my income (6 million these days) showing Japanese tax?

    I am happy to be corrected re any info I posted and to have anyone clarify things asked about above.
    Thank you!
    Last edited by kawanop; Jun 17, 2009 at 11:22. Reason: paragraphs

  23. #73
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 16, 2005
    Location
    Tokyo
    Posts
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenski View Post
    My friend had all of those requirements. Opinion now?
    Maybe he was disqualified on his choice of friends?

    Seriously, all banks using different scoring systems - it could have been as simple as the amount of credit he already has.

  24. #74
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 10, 2010
    Posts
    1

    Smile

    I'm very glad that I came across this theme.
    I'm a foreigner living in Japan, permanent residence, Japanese husband (working for one of old major companies), kids, property, no loans on my name (though we have a loan for land and house - on my husband`s name), fluent Japanese and I have some amount of money on my deposit.
    My credit card applications were rejected three times... At first, I thought ithere was some mistake. Then I started to worry if I had something written on my name that I might not know about, etc - we called the credit company and, like other people here, have got the reply that the reason for rejection will not be disclosed. Very unsettling - one starts to feel that he is a suspect or something. Well, until I read the messages on this site - now I know that I'm not alone!
    I can live without a credit card but I would like to be able to purchase music and books etc online... Does anyone know how can I get around to that without a credit card?
    PS: Sorry if that's a stupid question - I actually never bought anything except things for which one can pay in cash or via a bank transfer, so I'm a novice in that.

  25. #75
    Just me Glenski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location
    Somecity, Japan (American)
    Posts
    80
    You have a few options. People who don't work cannot get credit cards, my J wife says.

    1. See if Amazon.co.jp will let you make an order to be delivered COD and not require a credit card number. We've had such deliveries made, and you pay when the books arrive, but I don't remember if we used my Amazon account or the related credit card info.

    2. You could send the money for such things via Post Office.

    3. You could try to get a store card, instead of a VISA, JCB, or other major card. For example, see if Parco or AEON will let you make such a card using your husband's bank information. My wife has a couple of these, but she said you have the option to use them as credit cards or just point cards. She took the latter option.

    4. You might also want to ask your husband if it's ok to use his credit card info when you place orders on Amazon. You'd probably have to use his name when you place the order, but that's between you and him to agree on.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Common Japanese misconceptions regarding foreigners
    By Maciamo in forum Immigration & Foreigners
    Replies: 123
    Last Post: Sep 22, 2010, 09:47
  2. Are Japanese more hypocritical with foreigners ?
    By Maciamo in forum Culture Shock
    Replies: 208
    Last Post: Nov 9, 2009, 00:25
  3. Replies: 201
    Last Post: May 10, 2008, 12:18
  4. Why don't the Japanese differentiate more between foreigners ?
    By Maciamo in forum Immigration & Foreigners
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Sep 22, 2005, 21:53
  5. Do you prefer cash or credit/debit cards ?
    By Maciamo in forum Polls
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: Sep 3, 2005, 11:09

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •