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Thread: Koizumi gets emotional in Brazil

  1. #26
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    No I am NOT Bex. I do know her though. She goes to the same internet cafe as I do. She showed me this web forum. Come to Robson street to this korean internet cafe. This place has over 45 computers.

  2. #27
    ************ craftsman's Avatar
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    So it's just coincidence that your posts are identical then?

  3. #28
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    Bex is my friend, and she is in my Japanese language class. She is my no. 1 rival, and we grew up together. You know we Caucasians taking advanced Japanese class stick together. We love playing a game of how many Nikkeijins we can beat out during exams, and tell them, 恥ずかしいよ、俺たちに負けてよ!Craftsman, where are you from, and what is your nationality?

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipokun View Post
    Just wondering why you picked up the 2nd quotation.
    There must be Japanese offsprings in Macao, however more than 300 years ago... well, some of them might emigrate to Brasil as Japanese...
    But had Portugese government been too cruel to accept the religious J refugees as citizens? Or have Japanese offsprings refused to assimilate to local communities there for such a long time?

    After visiting my friends and talking to their parents and grandparents there, I'm pleased to say that I can share the Koizumi's feeling.
    I'm sure that all Asian incl., Japanese can learn much from them for their diligence.
    Interesting enough, there still remain some nikkei communities where people hold more J tradtions/values, but Liberdade in Sao Paulo, a well-known nikkei town with a shinto torii gate, is not the Japantown anymore.
    It might be a good idea to browse what sort of person add the articles there. IP addresses doesn't tell everything, I know.
    I'd really love to help the nihon matsuri in Sao Paulo soon again.
    tchau, tchau.
    You know, if Brazil is a third world country or a second world one, and Japan is the first world one, why wouldnt all Japanese choose to retain their nationality through the lex sanguinis line? Being Japanese nationals, there is no way they can halt any of them from making ten times their wages, and can even lobby more rights in Shizuoka, Hamamatsu.

    A Japanese nissei or sansei who is British, Canadian or American renouncing their nationalities I could understand as a perfectly normal situation, but Brazil is not exactly economically even. If they want to access Japan for migration, as they have actually done, why not just keep it rather than worrying about a Nikkeijin visa? To travel to USA or any other developed country, using a Brazilian passport is not favorable to a Japanese one, although the US, Canadian, or British passport offers every advantage over the Japanese one, if not equal.

  5. #30
    Ike Ike! w1ngzer0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apollo View Post
    Brazil received more Japanese immigrants than other Latin American countries. Between 1,300,000 and 1,500,000 people of Japanese origin live in Brazil.
    The first Japanese immigrants to Brazil were those who went in 1908.
    When Brazil lacked workforces for farms, especially for coffee, and received European and Japanese immigrants to cover such needs.
    Brazil saw the Japanese as a promising provider of workforce, which matched Japanese government's intention to enlarge its presence in the world, and many Japanese families wanted to have a prosperous life abroad. Thousands of Japanese farmers wanted to go to Brazil to get rid of the poverty and make some money by working arduously for a couple of years, like guest-workers. More and more Japanese workers set out toward Sao Paulo whose number reached 20,686 between 1918 and 1925.
    Later, the Japanese farmers became more and more independent, having their own crops etc..
    Now the Japanese are 4th generation in Brazil.
    awesome. talk about a melting pot down there.

  6. #31
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    Brazil is "the closest to my heart. All the people who have persevered under different weather, language, food and customs welcomed the prime minister of Japan," Koizumi recalled, pausing for a moment to wipe his tears.
    I found this nice song
    http://www.nikkeyshimbun.com.br/imag...onesa16bit.mp3


    http://www.nikkeyshimbun.com.br/toku...lumn-yumi.html

    Btw Mr.Juniti saito became a supreme commander of brasilian air force(Tenente Brigadeiro-do-Ar e Comandante da Aeronautica)
    http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/yoshijiwada/23124185.html

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Apollo View Post

    The first Japanese immigrants to Brazil were those who went in 1908.

    2005 NHK television drama ハルとナツ ( Haru e Natsu ) retold 1 such journey.

    * In 1934, Haru and her family emigrated from Hokkaido to Brazil.

    http://wiki.d-addicts.com/Haru_to_Natsu

  8. #33
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    tokapi
    this is so interesting though it is sad
    http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%8B%...81%A1%E7%B5%84
    http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E8%87%...80%A3%E7%9B%9F
    because there was no information...

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duo View Post
    Why is that there are so many Japanese in Brazil ? Any specific reasons
    What the hell people think Brazil is? A bunch of Mexican drug-dealers dancing Samba and playing football? Tsk.

    Brazil has more people of Japanese descent than USA, in case people here didn't know.

    The "Japantown" mentioned earlier is a Japanese-styled neighborhood in São Paulo. You can still hear people speaking Japanese in the streets. Most of the stores there have the products names in Japanese and Portuguese. You can find J-dramas, J-music, action figures, animes, manga, high-tech imported products being sold there.

    In 2008 Brazil is commemorating 100 years of Japanese immigration, and there are being a lot events in the whole country, all-year long.

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