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Maciamo
Jun 3, 2003, 11:07
I was wondering if "kite mite" could mean both "come and see" and "try to see". How can I know exactly what is the meaning ? They are so similar than the context won't help much. If I really want to say "try to see something", can I translate it "kore wo mite tsutomete ?" or is it strange ?

Thanks.

NANGI
Jun 3, 2003, 13:54
Konnichiwa Maciamo-san!

I can understand your confusion. "kite mite" means "come and see" undoubtedly.:D
An instance, "来て, 見て". "来て, 見て" is "come and see" and means "Please come here and enjoy watching". Usually this word is used for an advertisement. But this sentence "来て, 見て" is a coined word "Kuru" and "Miru" and is not correct Japanese sentence.

"kite mite" is not "come and see" originally. "kite" means "come" certainly, this is not a mistake. But in this case, "mite" means "Kokoromiru" but not "Miru". "kokoromiru" means "try doing".

An instance,
"Yatte mite" means "Please try it".
"Tabete mite" measn "Please try the dish".
"Mite mite" means "Please try watching".

"Atarashii Apa-to ni Hikkoshi tanda. kitemite"(I moved into a new apartment. Please visit). In this case, "Kitemite" measn "Please try visiting my new room".
"Pasokon no Choushi ga Warui n da. Kitemite"(My computer has trouble. Please come here and mend my computer). In this case, "Kitemite" measn "Please come here and mend(watch) my computer". In Japanese, "Miru(watch)" means "mend" sometimes.
"Kimi ni Fuku wo Katte kita yo. Kitemite"(I got new dress to you. Please put on now). In this case, "Kitemite" measn "Please try wearing new dress". Of course "Kite" means "Kiru(wear)" originally but not "Kuru(come)".

And you can not say "kore wo mite tsutomete". Because "tsutomete" means "try", but "try" is "mite" in this case. "kore wo Mite mite" is correct.

Sorry my poor English.:p

NANGI

Maciamo
Jun 3, 2003, 23:54
"Pasokon no Choushi ga Warui n da. Kitemite"(My computer has trouble. Please come here and mend my computer). In this case, "Kitemite" measn "Please come here and mend(watch) my computer". In Japanese, "Miru(watch)" means "mend" sometimes.

You can say it in English too : "My computer is not working. Could you come and have a look at it ?"

Here "have a look" means "try to repair" (quickly), but "see" cannot be used in this sense in English. But in Japanese all "see, look and watch" are "miru", which adds to the confusion. In short,"look" is active (concentrate), "watch" is looking at an action or scene passively, and "see" is just the perception/sense.

But with all this, can I say "kite mite" when I mean "try to come", as in "I've climbed at the top of a tree. Try to come yourself now". Ki no ue ni nobotte, ima anata mo kite mite".

Kite mite can mean :
- come and see (contemplate)
- come and have a look (try to repair)
- try to come
- try clothes (wear)
- try to cut
- "wear and see" (wear it and see if it fits/suits you"
- "cut and see" (cut it and see what happens)

Usually my wife misunderstands me (more than the opposite) because of things like this. I know what I mean, but that's not the common usage, so she doesn't get it, though she is the native speaker. Same for kanji words like "shou" or "kou" that have so many meanings your interlocutors is left staring at you because they don't know what you mean when you use them.

Elizabeth
Jun 4, 2003, 00:21
Originally posted by Maciamo
You can say it in English too : "My computer is not working. Could you come and have a look at it ?"

Here "have a look" means "try to repair" (quickly), but "see" cannot be used in this sense in English. But in Japanese all "see, look and watch" are "miru", which adds to the confusion.
Nangi-san,
Did you mean miru used as "mind" -- like look after, attend to, care for, etc ("mendo wo miru" for instance.) Or mend as well?

samuraitora
Jun 4, 2003, 03:48
THat is very confusing!!!

NANGI
Jun 4, 2003, 11:36
Konnichiwa Minasan!

to Maciamo-san

You can say it in English too : "My computer is not working. Could you come and have a look at it ?"

Oh, it is same as the Japanese expression! Thanks Maciamo-san, I didn't know this expression! :note:


Kite mite can mean :
- try to cut
- "cut and see" (cut it and see what happens)

In this case, "Kiru(cut)" is "Kitte" but not "Kite". "Kitte mite" is right! Those are very similar and confusing.:D
BUT usually "Kitte" is "postage stamp" in Japan. "Kitte mite" has another meaning "Look this stamp". Umm... confusing.:D


Usually my wife misunderstands me (more than the opposite) because of things like this. I know what I mean, but that's not the common usage, so she doesn't get it, though she is the native speaker.

I can understand your confusion and effort. I had joined other forum before when I came this forum. That forum is in Germany and I must wrote in German. But my German is beginner level and I could not wrote my opinion in German exactly. On the contrary, I could not even read German.:D
It is very difficult to say my opinion exactly in other language. But I respect you, Maciamo-san. Because you can speak Japanese and you persevering with your effort to learn Japanese seriously. I already gived up to learn German because I can not say my opinion exactly in English even now.:p

to Elizabeth-san

Did you mean miru used as "mind" -- like look after, attend to, care for, etc ("mendo wo miru" for instance.) Or mend as well?

You always notice good(difficult) point, Elizabeth-san.:giggle:
Yes, you are right! "miru" means "look after" or "take care of" too. "mendo wo miru" is good instance.

I said, "Miru" means "mend" sometimes. But "Miru" can be used for a human too. An instance, "Me ga warui no de Isya ni Mitemoratta". It means "I had eye trouble and saw the doctor". Oh, there is "see"! This expression is the same as Japanese too!:emblaugh:

to samuraitora-san

Yes, there is a lot of meaning in a word and it is confusing. But there is a lot of the same meaning between English and Japanese too. Learning language is fun!:D

NANGI