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Maciamo
Nov 13, 2006, 18:17
A bit over 4 years ago, I made a poll What are your interest for Japan ? (http://www.wa-pedia.com/forum/showthread.php?t=564). This poll was very general and regarded "interests", regardless of whether members had actually been to Japan or not.

(If you wonder, I voted for every option in the poll, except Anime & Manga, Video Games and J-Pop, although I do not dislike them occasionally, but I do not have a deep interest enough compared to the other items on the list).

One and a half years ago, I asked our members what they thought werethe Greatest Japanese contribution to the world ? (http://www.wa-pedia.com/forum/showthread.php?t=16125). This is a non-personal poll, not asking what you like, but what has had the biggest impact on other cultures, economies and lifestyles around the world.

3 weeks ago, I realised that nobody had posted a poll about the negative side of Japan, in spite of the fact that there had been many threads discussing them. So I created a poll What do you dislike about Japan ? (http://www.wa-pedia.com/forum/showthread.php?t=27145)

In reaction to that, the next day, craftsman, who joined recently and probably hadn't seen my old poll, started a thread What do you like about Japan and Japanese people? (http://www.wa-pedia.com/forum/showthread.php?t=27151). However I find his poll to be far too personal, and in fact couldn't find anything to vote for despite my long list of things I like about Japan.

So I decided to create a new poll, this time not about Japan-related interests, nor peculiar likings, but more general likings about living in Japan. I will do my best to include as many options as possible and not just those that are true for me.

Do not excpect to find things like anime, video games or martial arts in the poll, because they are hobbies that can be enjoyed outside Japan as well, and aren't part and parcel of living in Japan. This poll is also not about Japanese contributions, but how you (and only you) feel about life in Japan.

RockLee
Nov 13, 2006, 18:55
Although I didn't stay in Japan that long, this is what I liked about living there. :)

Bucko
Nov 13, 2006, 22:30
A lot of those points are really precise and detailed. Good job putting the list together.

yukio_michael
Nov 14, 2006, 01:49
Voted. Though some things like "shopping on a Sunday", which would be less prevalent or non-existent in Europe, is not such a big thing in the United States--- as everyone goes shopping on Sunday, and though some small stores may be closed or close early, most large stores are open the same hours.

hkBattousai
Nov 14, 2006, 04:11
I really wonder Japanese love hotels...

Karamuucho
Nov 14, 2006, 08:43
Looks like people hate giving gifts huh! Haha, I think it's a marketing scam myself, but I do it for relatives (and will probably do it for everyone else).

yukio_michael
Nov 15, 2006, 00:42
Looks like people hate giving gifts huh! Haha, I think it's a marketing scam myself, but I do it for relatives (and will probably do it for everyone else).Well, take a look at valentine's day in Japan--- definitely a marketing scam, and they managed to squeeze two distinct holidays into it!

Rather than lose the adult male market, who aren't expected to be eating sweets, Japanese chocolate companies, since the mid 1980's have went on massive PR blitzes to promote "adult" candy...

gaijinalways
Nov 15, 2006, 13:28
Some of the points seemed odd, like;
Low taxes (relatively true, but...higher and higher insurance premiums, ah, the downside of making more money).
The ability to integrate foreign concepts and systems, do you mean like Chinese characters, ha ha?
Good service and attention to customers, are we including real estate agencies and some 'private' clubs?
For cell-phones, the 'quality' of service was subpar for quite awhile as Japan couldn't seem to integrate their service. Hence, we used to have 2 phones, one for Europe and one for Japan.
As to political demonstrations, the black vans outside the language school I work at spewing right-wing nonsense don't count?!

Maciamo
Nov 15, 2006, 17:26
Some of the points seemed odd, like;
Low taxes (relatively true, but...higher and higher insurance premiums, ah, the downside of making more money).
The ability to integrate foreign concepts and systems, do you mean like Chinese characters, ha ha?
Good service and attention to customers, are we including real estate agencies and some 'private' clubs?
For cell-phones, the 'quality' of service was subpar for quite awhile as Japan couldn't seem to integrate their service. Hence, we used to have 2 phones, one for Europe and one for Japan.
As to political demonstrations, the black vans outside the language school I work at spewing right-wing nonsense don't count?!

As I said, this list is extensive enough to match most people's liking of Japan. It doesn't mean that you have to agree with all of them. You will notice that I didn't vote for any of the points you mentioned for the reasons you mentioned. :-) (except mobile phones because systems are actually different in North America, Europe and Japan, like for a lot of electronics)

taehyun
Nov 16, 2006, 12:49
This poll is nice, but I find it little bit one-sided concerning the gender.I mean these topics about the cute girls and women in kimono...Would you add, some topics about your female voters, please?

Talitha_Cumi
Nov 26, 2006, 17:14
tahahaa,
it's simply that J-men are not universally popular!
or those who visits abroad are mainly males.
Much more males visit Japan, than woman.
da!

Maciamo
Nov 26, 2006, 17:33
I am simply amazed. So far the most popular reason to like living in Japan is : reliable trains !

taehyun
Nov 26, 2006, 19:02
tahahaa,
it's simply that J-men are not universally popular!
I know that, and believe me, there's reason for that:kanashii:

or those who visits abroad are mainly males.
Much more males visit Japan, than woman.
Probably...Noone can be sure:okashii:
I was just acusing Maciamo of sexism .Is this a typical Belgian feature, or personal problem?

White Rose
Dec 3, 2006, 23:16
I know that, and believe me, there's reason for that:kanashii:
Probably...Noone can be sure:okashii:
I was just acusing Maciamo of sexism .Is this a typical Belgian feature, or personal problem?

fight! fight! fight!

:p

japantvhost
Dec 10, 2006, 14:00
I think what most gaijin like about Japan is what they don't like in their home countries. What they don't like about Japan is what they like in their home countries.

Maciamo
Dec 14, 2006, 23:16
I think what most gaijin like about Japan is what they don't like in their home countries. What they don't like about Japan is what they like in their home countries.
True for most things, but not all in my case. For example I like Japanese food, but also my country's food. It's just different.

blue_rebel
Dec 14, 2006, 23:29
I absolutely love 100-yen shops. Yay for the hyaku-en shoppu!!! :D
Every time I visit Japan I spend loads time in the 100-yen shops buying all sorts of junk, from mascara to hair clips to funky stuff for my pet dogs. I also love the fact that the streets are MUCH cleaner than in Malaysia, and the roads are broad and rarely ever seem congested (yay for public transport). Plus, the buses and trains are almost always punctual.

Maciamo
Dec 20, 2006, 03:35
Reliable trains is definitely the best reason for living in Japan : 80% of votes so far (20 voters). *sarcastic tone* Makes newcomers want to go to Japan, doesn't it ? Any trainspotters on the forum ?

Mrjones
Dec 30, 2006, 21:07
Life is convinient once you get to Japan and get a job. I quess that is the main reason why many people stay in Japan for a long time. Trains are part of this convinience.

Philanti
Jan 13, 2007, 15:39
food is not cheap there, and popmusic is very good too.

Arch
Jan 15, 2007, 06:09
The food without a doubt ! It just saves so damn good ! man its been two years sine i posted here !

Mathan
Jan 15, 2007, 06:30
Well guys and girls..
Never been to Japan..but planning this Summer..

I love Japanese Animation since I was small.... And Japanese Cars..Drive an imported model in Germany myself
architecture is wonderful too...

Cheery Cherry
Jan 15, 2007, 11:59
Well, I don't live in Japan, but I sure do miss it. I really miss the food, people and the way the houses are built...with kotatsu and tatami...*sigh*...

Taiko666
Jan 16, 2007, 11:07
architecture is wonderful too...

Mathan, you are in for a big, big, big shock when you get here. Enjoy!

Pachipro
Jan 24, 2007, 02:25
What do I like about living in Japan? Hmm it's hard to say as there are so many things I like.

I like the way the trains were always on time right to the second. If the sign said the train departs at 10:42 you can be damn sure it will.

Easy, cheap and accessable food like ramen at the corner shop, or "eki"soba at the station. A quick "onigiri" at the local "7-11" or Lawsons convenience stores or Gyudon or ramen late at night. Ramen was especially good at the street stalls.

Being able to buy beer at all hours of the night at convenience stores. (Back in the day it was 24/7/365 beer and whiskey machines.)

If I was alone at home and hungry I could always dial up the local Chinese or Japanese restaurant, Sushi ya san, pizza, or ramenya san, and it would be delivered in a short time, in glass bowls and plates! No tips or anything. Just leave the plates outside when you're done and they'll pick them up. If you were a foreigner and they could understand your Japanese it didn't matter.

Always getting an "irashiaimase" (welcome) when entering, or a "domo" (thank you) when leaving an establishment, whether they really ment it or not. Or the cashier in the supermarket or department store handing you your change on the receipt and bowing to you and thanking you for shopping there. For some reason you felt that they appreciated your business.

The excellent customer service I always received anywhere in Japan. I especially liked when you needed your oil changed that Toyota would send a couple of men in a car to your house, leave you a car and take yours to be serviced. At the end of the day they would retrurn your car with the oil changed, vacumed, and washed all at no extra charge.

I liked the sense of community in that all the neighbors would participate in keeping the neighborhood and streets cleaned and that there would be a few days set aside throughout the year for the general cleaning of the neighborhood. I also enjoyed the greetings of the neighbors at all times of the day, whether they knew me personally or not after living in the neighborhood for a while. Even though I was a foreigner almost no one ignored me.

I like the hustle and bustle of the major cities and the fact that you could buy anything you desired and I also enjoy the crowds of people. I also like the serenity of my local area in the suburbs. Just a 7 minute walk from the train station and you are completely isolated from any noises. Also, you could be 10 minutes from a major train station and feel like you were in the country with little farms just off the major roads. Quite a contrast.

I liked the fact that, with a minimal amount of money and minimal hassle, I was in business for myself teaching English out of my home and an accountant provided me, free of charge for one year, at the expense of the local government.

I like that you can get virtually anywhere in the country by train/mass transit.

I like that you only heat/cool the rooms you are using as it seems such a waste in my country to heat/cool the entire house/apartment when 90% of it is not being used. Very uneconomical and a waste of energy. But when in Rome....

I like the Japanese winters also with warm, toasty rooms and kotatsu's to warm the feet and mikan and ocha and hot baths. And when "Haru ichiban" (first winds of spring) come you know warm weather is just around the corner.

I like the Japanese spring of warm air and cherry blossoms and parties and drinking under the cherry trees.

I like Japanese summers and the heat and humidity and beer gardens and oscillating fans and "air con" and the incense of the "katori senko" (mosquito killers); cold beers, cool edamame and cool showers. (The rainy season I can do without thank you.)

I like Japanese fall with the crisp, dry air and the changing of the trees.

Most of all I like, for the most part, being treated with very little discrimination or animosity from my neighbors or the places I visit, especially when I visit for the first time. For example, I am still greeted warmly in my old neighborhood when I return for visits and, when I recently made a reservation at an onsen, my family name, in katagana, was listed outside the onsen, alongside the other Japanese guests as one of "todays guests", and not once was I made to feel like a foreigner.

I especially liked the fact that when dinner was to be served that night in our room and I was taking my bath and only my wife and mother-in-law were present, that the lady serving our meals said, "we'll wait for the 'master' to return." When my wife told that to me it kind of made me feel like I was not a foreigner.

ludoNL
Jan 24, 2007, 04:09
I really miss Mister Cash's thoughts on this subject.

I, myself, haven't been to Japan yet so I can't judge.

hind
Feb 6, 2007, 12:08
I, myself, haven't been to Japan yet so I can't judge.
same here T.T
is since my age 7years I want to desert my country to Japan because Japan for me Anime world.*SIGH*

KirinMan
Feb 6, 2007, 16:31
One or should I say a couple of options that I didn't see on this poll I would like to make a comment (s)about.....oh btw I think the poll was pretty good for pointing out many of the things that people might like about this country.

Anyway, I like the ability to walk down the streets here, day or night and not have to fear for my life. Of course there is crime here but nothing in comparison to the US. No drive by shootings, drugs are not being pushed on the street corners to kids not even old enough to drive.

I also like the ability to, within reason of course, trust people for whom they say they are. To me I rarely hear of "gaijin" getting ripped off by some con-man looking to make a buck. Not saying that it doesn't happen but nothing like the door to door rip off artists in the states.

While petty crime exists, and murders are increasing, it is still one of the safest countries in the world.

Mikawa Ossan
Apr 3, 2007, 06:56
I like how food is not so loaded with sugar like it is in the U.S. I like how we recycle here. I like the fact that I have never seen a "self-checkout" lane here. I like having streets that are not a mile wide for each lane, and intersections that are divided four ways or more by concrete barriers.

Abasio
Apr 17, 2007, 22:52
I like

1. The safety. Nowhere near as many Scallies as in England
2. The reliable public transport
3. The convenience stores everywhere
4. Being able to shop at reasonable times
5. The customer service you get which improves the more you say please/thank you
6. The obsession with music
7. Everything is so cheap (well most stuff)
8. All signs are so cute
9. The lack of religious freaks (note I like religious people but the die hard freaks I don't like too much)
10. If you want to get rid of someone pestering you just say "I don't understand"
11. The range of food available even in the suburbs.
12. The girls are very pretty.
13. I am better looking here
14. Engrish
15. Tabe Houdai
16. Nomi Houdai
17. All night Karaoke
18. Summer music festivals
19. Beach bars
20. The fact that living in Kanto gives you almost limitless things to do, really close to your house.
.
.
.
.
.
etc

Dark Shi
Apr 22, 2007, 19:43
I love the season and Matsuri *_*

bakaKanadajin
May 15, 2007, 22:04
I liked how many holidays the Japanese get, if I was working there as something other than an English teacher I probably would have had something close to a month paid vacation rather than just 2 weeks. Golden week plus the other assorted holidays is alot of holidays. In Canada we don't get nearly as many.


The lack of crime, the trust-based culture of Japanese society, these are all very attractive also. I'm from Toronto which is another safe city but we have about as much crime as NY relatively speaking, its a big Western city its unavoidable. Tokyo was really safe by contrast, cleaner too, I could 'let my guard down' in Tokyo.

Chipi
May 31, 2007, 07:05
Just to note that even though i marked also the Japanese nature and seasons, I absolutely love them, but we also have them both here in Finland.
Seasons are maybe even more clear here.
What we are lacking here, are the gorgeous mountains and streams.

FrustratedDave
Jun 22, 2007, 22:46
What do I like about Japan?

Hmmm............ The beer and the beer, actually I am drinking it right now. What else do I like? The beer!

SushiShin
Jun 25, 2007, 15:56
women and the hairstyle i think everything!! everything about japan is good except ofcourse there are no samurais and they hunt whale's :(

Thuglife
Aug 5, 2007, 13:21
What do I like about Japan?
Hmmm............ The beer and the beer, actually I am drinking it right now. What else do I like? The beer!


Amen..

And everyone around here treats me like a rock star.

Wantalk
Aug 16, 2007, 04:08
My value as a freak.

How children stare open mouthed at me then forget to turn their bodies as I walk past and almost snap their necks.
How people avoid sitting next to me on public transport, leaving me with more space.
How officials are not confident to interact with me about a problem, due to their lack of English skills and non-belief that I can speak Japanese, so they ignore me, and therefore with that done the problem of what I am doing does not exist.

Yes, I live in a very rural area.

maushan3
Sep 3, 2007, 13:20
And everyone around here treats me like a rock star.

I get the looks once in a while, until I went to school on Thursday, some clubs were practicing, more looks, then, today, wow!! I felt like David Beckham, no joke. I got like, all the looks, people started talking to me in English, shaking hands, and got many girls: attention. I really didnt think it was gonna be so good.

Mauricio

Evariste
Sep 16, 2007, 19:41
At the moment: my job, the climate/sun and the transport. Mainly my job - which is great.

WSIENGLISH
Sep 21, 2007, 20:01
"Prefer not to think about it"

Spelling Bee
Sep 23, 2007, 00:02
i like the kind friendly people!
just like this forum!
have much fun in your life and enjoy little things.
>~。~)

White Girl
Sep 28, 2007, 18:23
I chose a few things...mainly stuff like trains and food. There were a few things on the poll I actually considered negatives (homogeniety, for example).

Other than what's on the poll, one thing that I really like is that there are a lot of good places to meet friends and do things together. I am not a big bar/club type of person at all, but I love meeting my friends at a restaurant that has separate rooms per group and being able to talk amongst just each other, then head out for karaoke afterwards.

Another thing that wasn't on the list that I am starting to depend on and cannot really imagine being without is the coop services in the city. All you have to do is join a coop, click on the meal plan you want on the Internet, and they deliver each day's dinner ingredients and cooking instructions straight to the door--a complete balanced meal, tasty, and very fresh. I use a separate coop for organic breakfast ingredients and fruit. This has saved me sooo much hassle as a housewife!

I flip-flop about life in the city. Sometimes I hate how there's no green, and so much pollution, and so much noise and apathy...but sometimes I like the hustle and bustle and pulse of the city and the fact that there is always something to do nearby. Also I love the view from my veranda and really makes me feel like I'm a city girl. So, that depends on my mood.

Trains are fantastic, and I like the food and the variety of it. "Light" tasting food is my favorite and I have a bit of trouble eating too much sweets, but for the most part I am also a garbage disposal who will eat anything, and any country's food, happily. There isn't really anything I "miss" and feel like I need to get from America or Europe, but I think that would be true no matter where I go. Anyway, even if I did feel that way, there are several import stores nearby where I can get just about anything.

Also, this is not specific to Japan but my in-laws live very close, so I get to visit them often and they treat me like a queen and are very fun to talk with and be around :) I love my in-laws to death, and we even take trips together sometimes. And I have some very close friends from my old place of work that are a short train ride away. And we used to have sleepovers before I got pregnant...and they crack me up, and even listen to my occasional complaints. And then they crack me up again. Then again, I suppose that's not specific to Japan either, but it sure makes it easier to be here.

So, although I don't like Japan that well as a whole, I've managed to surround myself with wonderful things and am quite happy :) I also like taking trips out to the mountains. There is not much nature here but if you go out to those little pockets of green it is quite relaxing, and I love onsens. I do not know for the life of me why they don't have them in, say, the U.S.

Calchas
Oct 9, 2007, 20:49
Another thing that wasn't on the list that I am starting to depend on and cannot really imagine being without is the coop services in the city. All you have to do is join a coop, click on the meal plan you want on the Internet, and they deliver each day's dinner ingredients and cooking instructions straight to the door--a complete balanced meal, tasty, and very fresh. I use a separate coop for organic breakfast ingredients and fruit. This has saved me sooo much hassle as a housewife!

Now thats a cool idea! Wouldn't mind having something like that here in the states.

Glenski
Oct 10, 2007, 14:38
I have to take issue with a lot of those items in the poll list. Some are just plain weird.

Tasty and cheap food
Cheap? Have you actually shopped?

Speciality restaurants, which means quicker service
How do you figure quicker?

Order and respect of authority
Often hypocritical.

Cute girls with a real sense of fashion
One does not ensure the other. "Fashion" varies.

Japanese TV
You're joking, right?

Non-argumentative character of the Japanese
To your face, anyway.

Low taxes (by European standards)
You haven't seen the recent increase in city tax, have you?

The ability to integrate aspects of foreign cultures and systems
Not sure what this implies, but there is a lot of integration that gets roadblocked, especially in the language teaching field.

The relative lack of political debates and demonstrations
Actually, it would be nice to see/hear a real debate now and then...
And, the annoyingly loud Red Army or election trucks make up for any peacefulness in between elections.

Good service and attention to customers
Except for the "Japanese Only" places, of course.

How easy it is to move around cities in bicycle
Easy? Convenient, perhaps, but often quite dangerous, I thought!

The homogeneity of society
Not sure why this is a positive.

The fact that Japanese banks don't charge monthly fees on bank accounts
Counterbalanced by the practically non-existent interest rates.

Kitsch decoration (pink, neons, cute characters...)
Make me want to puke, so this is actually a negative.

The kindness and interets showed toward foreigners
Depends.

The blissful joy and excitement of Japanese women
This one was the most curious to me. What the heck does it mean, anyway?

The dedication to work of the "salarymen"
Never heard any foreigner say this was a positive!

Shopping on Sundays
I do that back home, too. What is so novel about it here?

The ambiance music in train stations and cute voice of the announcers
Too loud for me, and there is nothing "cute" about those voices.

The sense of honour (linked to the concept of "face" and "embarassment")
Often gone against. Have you seen the news lately?

The customs of "omiyage" and "duty presents" (who doesn't like giving and receiving gifts ?)
Me. I don't like having an obligation to buy a gift for people I hardly know, or buy something for the office every time I go on a trip.

Living in Japan made me know JREF
Many posters here don't even live in Japan, nor have they ever!

So, what do I like about Japan?
my wife and her family
onsens and sentos and my large home bathtub, plus the ease of cleaning the bathroom
heated toilet seats (I'll skip the bidet function, thank you)
edamame
some (not all) foods
being able to spend a 10,000 yen bill in 7-Eleven even if all I wanted was a Coke
distance at the crosswalks, and the time interval when lights change, making it safer (for me)
relative soundproofness of newer apartments
chopsticks
tatami floors
being able to get rid of salesmen by telling them I'm not Japanese
Amazon.jp's lack of shipping charges on anything over 1500 yen, and the delivery speed
the chance to meet some really terrific internationally minded foreigners
most of my job and its perks, plus the ease to take on side work like proofreading
bilingual DVD movies that help my kid retain both languages
national health insurance
some of the high technology
did I mention my wife? :)

maushan3
Nov 9, 2007, 21:58
Damn, I was reading your rant on Japan and thought it was gonna be all negative, but now I see otherwise.

What I like about Japan. (me, please don't rant on me).
Being a gaijin in Japan.
I find girls beautiful.
How I am seen as a rockstar to these girls.
rental Cd shops.
Reliable public transportation.
¥100 McShakes.
My high school.
My soccer club.
Being able to go to Nagoya on any free day.

Mm, many more things, I can't put them all.

Mauricio

centrajapan
Dec 7, 2007, 01:20
Japan is uptight yet mellow. Norway is mellow yet uptight.

Food is better there. Its less Xenophic here yet more people are arrogant and racist here. The society as a whole is less judgmental yet at the personal level they are more judgmental in Norway.

What I like about Japan is the people. Its a good place.

Kyoto Returnee
Dec 18, 2007, 22:16
more people are arrogant and racist here.
What I like about Japan is the people. Its a good place.

I can agree it's a great place, but I cannot agree that Japanese people are arrogant and racist, at least from my experiences.

I have found Japanese to warm right up to me, or maybe that's just me.

Have you experienced racism in Japan? In what form?

centrajapan
Dec 19, 2007, 00:22
Kyoto Returnee. I meant Norwegians are more arrogant than Japanese in general. Norwegians think they are the best and they are full of themselves. Ofcource not everyone etc but in general from my opinion. There are many levels of racism. Ranging from hate crimes to not knowing what you say or do is racist.

I haven't experienced getting kicked out or beaten up any place because of my ethnicity. Its more of an indirect subtle type of racism which you think about.

lwgrm
Jan 11, 2008, 01:01
I am not sure of it. Even though I was a foreigner almost no one ignored me.

Sensationalist
Jan 11, 2008, 05:51
:p1) The vending machines offer the greatest variety of goods.
2) The most efficient transportation system in the world.
3) The largest variety of restaurants all at four star level.
4) The most accomidating country in the world in terms of cultural understanding e.g. Japanese are willing to learn about a wider variety of cultures with great enthusiasm.
6) The best agricultural products in the world in terms of agriculture and production and methodology.
7) Drinkable tap water straight from the faucet to the mouth .
8) The most desirable( not beautiful) women in the world.
9) Every season has a theme point !
10) The sexiest obachaans and momachans by far. The aging population are very attractive.
11) The cutest babies.
12) 12 national holidays. In America we only have six and lucky to get paid for one of those holidays.
13) The vending machines offer the widest selection of goods.
14) No religious extremist with the exception of Aum( cult)
15) Very good night scene; clubs, parties , etc.,
16) Love Hotels for every fetish !
17) over 3000 registered hot springs

turujirou
Feb 15, 2008, 23:12
i love specialy i dont know how its not number one. but how they treat customers is just amazing.

Valashu-kun
Feb 20, 2008, 17:18
animation/manga made me interested in Japan when I was a kid, now i just booked a 21 trip to Japan for this August. I also read things about the famous order and respect in Japan. plus the hotsprings seems really nice to me.
Also i would like to add sailor school costumes ;p

turujirou
Feb 23, 2008, 13:19
@Valashu-kun

i live here in japan and the whole respect thing isnt all that great, specially if ur a foreigner living in japan. but u will have a good time has just a tourist. have fun

allici
Mar 16, 2008, 01:32
Nya...
I love animes, mangas, j-music <<aham aham aham aham
and how the japaneses lives

*&#172;*

Iron Chef
Mar 16, 2008, 04:11
Love the ladies in the spring/summertime!!! Short skirts, high heels, hot weather... = great eye candy 8-)

Wow... the longer I stay here the more I start to sound like ghettocities...

suz135
Apr 10, 2008, 11:48
I love the transportation system, especially the trains. So convenient. They can be expensive at times but I'd rather take the train than buy a car.

Mavrek
Apr 23, 2008, 09:59
Peoples are very helping and nice . They love each other because my friend told me who visit last time japan. That its a nice place to live.

Bunshinsaba
Apr 23, 2008, 23:27
No multi-culturalism - 99.8 percent one race! Everyone generally thinks the same way and paddles the same way up the river. Similarly, they agree with, generally accept, and follow the same rules. There is so little social confusion. And unlike some foreigners, I never complain about the system they put us through. I accept I am visitor (going on 10 years)and if I have renew my VISA every 3 years (and what a pain!), get fingerprinted at the airport, and many other little things just to live here under the rich umbrella of their socially-smooth-as-silk nation... so be it.

And as a people, the Japanese are easy and pleasent to live amongst. They are clean, well-dressed, polite, quiet, tolerant of those around them, and never stand on a soap box, stomp their feet and yell... "I got RIGHTS!! I'm an INDIVIDUAL... Listen to ME!!!" at the slightest sign of social inconvenience. Unlike most Westerners, the Japanese generally realise they the old adage, the needs of the many out weigh the needs of the few.


Now, if only there was more space, cheaper golf courses, and you could buy turkey at Thanksgiving... I would live here forever.

ASHIKAGA
May 10, 2008, 18:09
Why is it that there is no mention of Japanese MEN?? :?

Mikawa Ossan
May 10, 2008, 20:53
Good point. Japanese men is probably lacking as an option because a man made up this poll. I'll see if I can't add it as an option, as the OP is no longer an active member as such.

EDIT: Sorry, it looks like 20 is the limit for poll options...

Charles Barkley
May 12, 2008, 10:23
Here is what I like that would be hard/harder to find in my home country (USA):

-feel safe everywhere
-ability to live without a car (ie, density of cities, public transportation)
-enjoy using the language
-food culture, in particular the small restaurants/coffee shops (though out in the inaka japanese food is utter ****, I am so sick of it and can't wait to move to the city)
-I feel more skilled here/feel like there are more opportunities for me here, now, at this stage in my life
-less complaining to relative strangers. The japanese complain, but in America I just had random people complaining to me all the time, whereas here its more to friends, etc

いじょうです。

Bunshinsaba
May 12, 2008, 13:33
Here is what I like that would be hard/harder to find in my home country (USA):
-feel safe everywhere
-ability to live without a car (ie, density of cities, public transportation)
-enjoy using the language
-food culture, in particular the small restaurants/coffee shops (though out in the inaka japanese food is utter ****, I am so sick of it and can't wait to move to the city)
-I feel more skilled here/feel like there are more opportunities for me here, now, at this stage in my life
-less complaining to relative strangers. The japanese complain, but in America I just had random people complaining to me all the time, whereas here its more to friends, etc
いじょうです。


Safe - yes.
No need for a car - yes
language use - :rolleyes:
food culture - perhaps, but still miss having turkey
skills - there's teaching English and ... what else? Unless you have a high level business skill that not one of the 123 million J-people here have... you teach English.
less complaining - Oh God.. GIANT YES!!! Westerners just never shut up and blow off steam at anyone in ear shot. And you might want to add how Westerners love to speak at high volumes so people - not apart of their immediate compnay - can still hear their opinions, rants, complaints, you name it.

diceke
May 12, 2008, 14:41
Westerners just never shut up and blow off steam at anyone in ear shot. And you might want to add how Westerners love to speak at high volumes so people - not apart of their immediate compnay - can still hear their opinions, rants, complaints, you name it.

Hmmm, so why is that?:clueless:

Bunshinsaba
May 13, 2008, 08:58
Hmmm, so why is that?:clueless:

It all goes back to "the self is important" concept in the West, whereas in Japan, people tend to see ranting in public, stating opinion loudly and brashly as a sign of embarassment, bridging on psychotic behaviour as it shows no signs of respect or consideration for others.

But Western children are worse than grown-ups or even teens; being told by their parents from the time they can crawl that they are little princes and princesses and that they are never wrong and that they are so so special!! All that breeds is rude, ignorant children who solve problems by raising their voice. Whenever I go home, I feel like I am in that old Star Trek epsiode with that planet of bratty, spoiled kids, who try to take over the Enterprise.

Chidoriashi
May 13, 2008, 13:32
Let`s see, I`m sure these have been said like 5000 times by now but here is my list.

Feeling of safety, not having to depend on a car/ convenience of things being close together, being foreign (this goes both ways though), easier to eat healthy, easy access to good tea, all you can drink deals, good ramen, good fish, not bored or fed up with it even after 4 years, being able to use my second language (Japanese) regularly.

diceke
May 13, 2008, 23:56
But Western children are worse than grown-ups or even teens; being told by their parents from the time they can crawl that they are little princes and princesses and that they are never wrong and that they are so so special!! All that breeds is rude, ignorant children who solve problems by raising their voice. Whenever I go home, I feel like I am in that old Star Trek epsiode with that planet of bratty, spoiled kids, who try to take over the Enterprise.
I hate it when those kids raise their voice and make a big scene here at JREF.:D

Bunshinsaba
May 14, 2008, 09:11
I hate it when those kids raise their voice and make a big scene here at JREF.:D


..................................JREF ???

Tragedy
Jun 3, 2008, 10:30
I'm here for the cars.

YouHeDad
Jun 22, 2008, 18:12
Moss burger
Arcades
Yoshinoya
Shinjuku
Love the vending machines

Nall-ohki
Jun 26, 2008, 03:05
Moss burger
Arcades
Yoshinoya
Shinjuku
Love the vending machines

You love a lot more than that according to your blog... :-)
By the way, check your PMs.

tokapi
Jun 26, 2008, 04:32
A Taiwan neighbor once worked and lived in Nagoya,has a long list of things she liked about living in Japan.


She could even sing the ever popular Japanese folk song

" Sakura ... Sakura ... :sing: ".

tada
Jun 26, 2008, 07:02
I checked almost that whole list. A few especially though, when compared to where I live now (Seattle, WA) Yes, I don't live in Japan, but I have been there twice, soon to be three times.

Reliable Trains - Here, you either sit in gridlock or ride buses that are consistently up to 15 minutes late.

Mild and dry seasons, distinct seasons - The temperatures in Tokyo would be perfect for me almost the year round. Even the temperatures in January are not cold for me, and post-tsuyu summer is a little hot for my taste, but tolerable. Compare that to Seattle weather, where total and utter crap is too kind for describing its weather about 7-8 months of the year.

Now for the not so Seattle-centric stuff.

Also, there is just so much more fun stuff to do there. Whenever I have been there on vacation, I was in my hotel room to sleep, shower, and not much else. I was out in the city about 15 hours a day, compared to here, where the nightlife doesn't interest me at all. Japan you have awesome pachinko parlors, karaoke, and game centers to go to... here, the nightlife just doesn't interest me at all.

Japanese TV... I am just a total ****** for it, especially the completely wacky shows (i.e. Human Tetris). Unlike American TV seems like nothing but dramas and reality shows.

Politics... here in the US, just eww. I think Bush is one of the worst presidents in history, and I am so sick of turning on the radio and hearing how one or the other candidate is corrupt in some way. The economy is in the toilet too. In my Japanese history class, we learned a term called "amerika-byou" (American sickness). I can see why it was invented.

Also, just so advanced in technology. There, technology develops in really cool and useful ways (i.e. toilets with remote controls, human-esque robots, etc.). Here in the US we use technology for stuff like making shoddy operating systems, anti-piracy measures (*cough* DRM *cough*), and basically being Big Brother.

I could go on and on, but my post would be as long as a dissertation. Really, really hope I can move to Japan someday. So much there appeals to me, while here things have been going downhill since 2003.

priji
Jun 27, 2008, 20:25
I like japan, because it's nature is beautiful and very peaceful people and How easy it is to move around cities in bicycle.

~AXI's.black.neko~
Jul 30, 2008, 09:49
i would love to live there because of the japanese interesting food,japanese nature and the otaku culture!

Bunshinsaba
Jul 30, 2008, 23:28
I
Japanese TV... I am just a total ****** for it, especially the completely wacky shows (i.e. Human Tetris). Unlike American TV seems like nothing but dramas and reality shows.



The Human Tetris concept was taken directly from a Russian TV skit show believe it or not; actually it does say that in "kanji" on the TV screen during the episode. Funny as hell, regardless.

Chirpy9
Sep 19, 2008, 17:47
Compared to India, I really like a few things about Japan like the trains of course, the nature in Japan, greenery, cute Obachans, department stores, neon lights, onsen, clean streets.
But their is a flip side also.
I'm a vegetarian, so can't comment much on food part.
The fashion - I dont think Japanese women really have a sense of fashion. They follow Kata, a definite style. If it is the winters, it is short skirt with high boots, an overcoat. In summers, it is one-piece or short skirt and shoes. During my stay in Japan, that's what I have mostly seen and that's why this comment.
Good service and attention to customers - Depends. I've been to vaious electronic stores and shops where the behavior of Japanese sales man was completely unacceptable. They literally start running away from you the moment they see you heading towards them with some query.
I know why they do this but it looks very embarassing at the outset.
Cute girls - Well, I guess they take the word 'Cute' quite seriously :)

tamada
Sep 23, 2008, 06:03
i like in japan alot of that and i love japanes pepole there are kind and sweet

____________________
TaMaDa

sudanesegirl
Oct 17, 2008, 07:42
i like the technolojy in japan

tinee92782
Dec 1, 2008, 09:57
hello Rock Lee..I like your avatar..its one reason I love Japan.

melon
Jan 11, 2009, 00:19
never been to Japan...will vote someday when i had the change to go there... :P

Incognito69
Mar 19, 2009, 12:08
Ofuro Banzai! Tatami Banzai! Futon Banzai! The Japanese traditional style houses is the cure to all nightmares unless I was watching ir reading Ayakashi stories at night. As I've mentioned in another post, I am a light and troubled sleeper but the nights in Japan were the best. We slept in futon on the tatami and I can roll around without having to worry that I might fall off my bed. The air was clean, the room was cosy though small. And the food was fabulous, just that we had to kneel throughout the meal.

Kappa
Apr 8, 2009, 00:22
I guess food would top my list, both home-cooked and restaurant. I'm not sure I'd call it cheap, but maybe it compares differently to Europe (I'm from the US). In addition to more traditional Japanese food you have things like the curry, the gyuu-don, panya-san, Japanese-Italian (including wafuu spaghetti) and Japanese-Chinese (sometimes you can't beat chahan, gyoza and beer). Sometimes I think of the country as one big izakaya: so much to try, so little time.

Darn near a tie are onsen and sentou (my home ofuro loses points for all the upkeep). I've been to some truly gorgeous rotenburo with views of mountains or the sea, and even neighborhood sentou are an experience you just can't have in the States.

The trains also make the list, but I'm a little more ambivalent. I enjoyed their convenience and being able to read during my commute. When it comes to rush-hour though, there's an element of "six of one, half-dozen of the other." Unlike in a US traffic-jam you generally are moving, but I've never had to be shoved bodily into my car by a white-gloved attendant.

Just getting to explore a culture different from the one I grew up in was one of the greatest things, but I guess that would be true of any foreign country.

Pachipro
Apr 8, 2009, 02:01
Kappa, I would've given you some good "rep" for your post above, but your profile says you have never been to Japan. However, from what you have written, either you have lived there or you copied from someone else. Which is it? Personally, I'd like to believe that you have lived there because you have "hit the nail on the head" so to speak and I'd like to commend you for it.


but I've never had to be shoved bodily into my car by a white-gloved attendant.
Then maybe you have never taken the trains in Tokyo during "rush hour".


Just getting to explore a culture different from the one I grew up in was one of the greatest things,
I agree wholehartedly.

Kappa
Apr 8, 2009, 05:36
Sorry, by "car" I meant my automobile in the States. I have indeed been sardined into Japanese trains.

I've lived in Japan for about five of the last ten years, generally somewhere along the Tobu-Tojo railway. I'll have to see about fixing my profile.

Sarawasti
May 31, 2009, 14:34
Never been to Japan ... But I'm sure planning on it... Maybe then I can vote... ;)

Mike Cash
May 31, 2009, 19:00
skills - there's teaching English and ... what else? Unless you have a high level business skill that not one of the 123 million J-people here have... you teach English.


I don't have a high level business skill that not one of the 123 million J-people here have....and I don't teach English.

Lots of foreigners in Japan don't teach English.

bamboo1986
May 31, 2009, 23:56
I love Japan...and people

SleekStylz
Jul 6, 2009, 17:38
I moved to Japan a year ago...living in Okinawa. I love Japan and I love the people. From the good customer service i get everywhere i go, nice phones, electronics, good food, nice clubs and beautiful women...oh and the nice beautiful beaches of Okinawa...no complaints from me.

makiyo
Oct 21, 2009, 14:59
I simply like J Pop :D :D :D

makiyoyoable
Oct 21, 2009, 18:27
"why do you like Japan?" My three mains reasons: *History *Festivals *Culture :wave: :D