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Mikawa Ossan
Nov 23, 2005, 11:56
Hi! I'm curious how to write certain things in Chinese. I don't mean Chinese characters as used in Japan, but Chinese characters used in China.

Sometimes the same words can be written differently in Japan and China. I'm curious about the Chinese end of things.

My first question is, how do you write "English" in Chinese?

Next is "Coca Cola"

And "McDonald's"

Anyone else with a question, please ask!

4321go
Nov 23, 2005, 16:56
Coca Cola=可口可乐
McDonald's= 麦当劳
English= 英语

feel free to ask~!

RockLee
Nov 23, 2005, 16:57
I asked my girlfriend and she said :
Coca Cola = 可口可乐 (kekou kele)
Mc Donalds = 麦当劳 (mai dang lao)

Weird Chinese :p

Oh, the time I posted this you already replied hehe ^^

Mikawa Ossan
Nov 23, 2005, 17:11
How about "ramen"?

4321go
Nov 23, 2005, 18:33
amen? of Christianism?
amen=阿门

Mikawa Ossan
Nov 23, 2005, 18:37
No, no! Ramen as in the food.

4321go
Nov 23, 2005, 18:45
Oh~! IC! ^_^

Ramen=拉面 (拉麵) which the pronunciation is quite similar~ 拉面 pronounce "lamian" , refer to :http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramen

Another Aoi Fan
Mar 21, 2006, 11:55
Oh~! IC! ^_^
Ramen=f if麵j which the pronunciation is quite similar~ f pronounce "lamian" , refer to :http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramen
Lamian isn't Ramen... Ramen are instant noodles... Lamien is Udon. lol

Shin yi mein/mian is Instant Noodles/Ramen. ((My grandparents)) But I think many other Chinese people ((my parents and I)) call is Ramen with a typical Chinese/Asian accent. lol:p

Supervin
Mar 21, 2006, 19:28
Ramen is actually '拉麵'.

Udon is '烏冬麵'.

They're both types of noodles, with the latter being a thicker type.

huayue
Jun 19, 2006, 13:20
Ramen is actually 'f麵'.
Udon is 'G~麵'.
They're both types of noodles, with the latter being a thicker type.

G~麵~~~哪种呢H

JimmySeal
Jun 19, 2006, 14:11
Most of that stuff is showing up funky on my computer, as in the last character of each compound is missing. Whatever they said for English, all I see is p.

Anyway using the Japanese IME, the Chinese word for English is p - ying wen, I think.

Glenn
Jun 19, 2006, 14:38
That means that your browser can't display simplified Chinese text on this forum. Everything that you see as a question mark is a simplified character. By the way, the word was 英語.

JimmySeal
Jun 19, 2006, 15:47
Japanese windows seems to be bad at displaying any non-English language other than Japanese. I can select 3 varieties of simplified Chinese, but they just make everything more garbled, and picking unicode didn't help either. I just discovered that picking [U[` fixes all the Chinese, but screws up mikawa ossan's sig. I'm lost.

Anyway, I think p and p both mean English, but in different contexts.

RockLee
Jun 19, 2006, 16:46
Japanese windows seems to be bad at displaying any non-English language other than Japanese. I can select 3 varieties of simplified Chinese, but they just make everything more garbled, and picking unicode didn't help either. I just discovered that picking [U[` fixes all the Chinese, but screws up mikawa ossan's sig. I'm lost.
Anyway, I think p and p both mean English, but in different contexts.Wow, afaik eibun and eigo are totally different. Eibun means "a sentence in English" whereas eigo means the language "English". not exactly the same you know.

JimmySeal
Jun 19, 2006, 18:53
We're talking about Chinese here. p is pronounced ying wen, not eibun. And p is pronounced ying yu.

Mikawa Ossan
Jun 19, 2006, 18:57
Jimmy Seal is right. This thread is in the China forum for a reason! :p

BTW, I noticed that the convenience store chain "Family Mart" in Taiwan is written as S, if my memory serves me right. It sounded like a great name for a store to me!

justin9213
Jun 20, 2006, 10:06
how do you write "I`m lovin it!"

JimmySeal
Jun 20, 2006, 10:17
If I remember correctly, it's something like 슽V, but I saw that 3 years ago, so I could easily be mistaken.

Glenn
Jun 20, 2006, 13:45
Just look on any McDonald's cup.

warakawa
Jun 22, 2006, 01:45
on the maccus cup, it says 我就喜欢 (wo jiu xi huan), which kinda have the meaning of "i like it no matter how crap it is".
which serves the maccus it's purpose of marketing, eat it no matter how unhealthy it is.

hot12lips12
Aug 18, 2007, 14:08
yah, the chinese on the mcDonald cup it means, i just like it...

kamaru
Sep 19, 2007, 16:54
Does knowing some Chinese help grasp kanji more? :note:

Uckey
Sep 30, 2007, 10:11
" Does knowing some Chinese help grasp kanji more? "

yes, I think so. When I learned Japanese I found it is easy to remember the words cause Chinese characters and kanji is so similar. But learning Japanese without knowing Chinese won't be difficult either.

Mikawa Ossan
Sep 30, 2007, 10:14
Is the corbonated beverage "7-Up" marketed in China? If so, what is it called, out of curiosity? doesn't seem right somehow.....

JimmySeal
Sep 30, 2007, 10:42
It appears to be
http://goods.ruten.com.tw/item/show?11070201515700
http://kk0139.kitchen.org.tw/T5004ShowCmdyData?y_KindId=5124&y_SketchName=Sketch1-2_Hi178

Mikawa Ossan
Oct 7, 2007, 20:24
What is "beer" in Chinese? , by any chance?

JimmySeal
Oct 7, 2007, 22:11
According to zhongwen.com, it's 啤 (pi2 jiu3).

http://zhongwen.com/d/176/d224.htm