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Maciamo
Mar 29, 2005, 23:06
Japan Times : Visa la difference
(http://www.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/getarticle.pl5?fl20050315zg.htm)


Although it is certainly not impossible to receive a credit card as a foreigner living in Japan, chances are that unless you're working for a major Japanese company that is prepared to provide you with a family card, you're probably going to be rejected far more often than you might be at home.

"I've heard anecdotes of card companies actually just categorically denying credit cards to foreigners," said Daniel Lintz, director of corporate communications for Visa International, Japan.

This surprises me as I haven't had any problem getting credit cards from 2 different card companies in Japan. They do verify a lot of stuff, but they didn't make me any problem.

I suppose this could be added to the already long list of types of discrimination in Japan (http://www.wa-pedia.com/society/discrimination_in_japan.shtml)

Mike Cash
Mar 30, 2005, 02:08
I'm surprised that you're surprised. Things may be easing up the slightest bit now, but routine denial used to be the norm.

I'll never forget filling out a Japanese application for an American Express card and receiving a rejection letter.....in English. An American being refused an American Express card just because he's an American.

misa.j
Mar 30, 2005, 07:28
I just thought about something.
What do people use for payment when they order something online in Japan, do they use a credit card?

I get a lot of credit card offers here in the U.S., but I don't think I got any when I was in Japan.

Maciamo
Mar 30, 2005, 09:49
I'm surprised that you're surprised. Things may be easing up the slightest bit now, but routine denial used to be the norm.

I'll never forget filling out a Japanese application for an American Express card and receiving a rejection letter.....in English. An American being refused an American Express card just because he's an American.

Funny, when I joined my local fitness club, they said I didn't have the choice but take their credit card (Visa or JCB) when registering. Many shops (eg. deparment stores) and companies have a credit card to their logo that give special discounts or points on their products or services. Have you tried that ? It's better than a regular CC anyway, as you get the points (even if it's only about 1% off, that's better than nothing).

Harvey
Apr 4, 2005, 23:47
Im about to apply for a credit card now. Curious if I will get rejected or not. I have an address, work for a big company, been here a while... If I do get rejected, I'm counting it as discrimination! (Or bad handwriting on my part.)

Maciamo
Apr 4, 2005, 23:52
Im about to apply for a credit card now. Curious if I will get rejected or not. I have an address, work for a big company, been here a while... If I do get rejected, I'm counting it as discrimination! (Or bad handwriting on my part.)

I don't even work for a Japanese company, and I got my first Japanese CC less than one year after coming to Japan. My wife said it's because I am married to a Japanese, but the CC company doesn't know (it's not mentioned on the application form).

Harvey
Apr 5, 2005, 00:06
Alright I feel more confidient now!

cookie85
Apr 7, 2005, 15:19
Funny, when I joined my local fitness club, they said I didn't have the choice but take their credit card (Visa or JCB) when registering.

That happened to me too, I joined a fitness club in 2001 and got a Visa credit card, issued by DC Card company. I had to send them a photocopy of my passport, Japanese visa and a certificate from my employer, which was annoying; but then I just got the card sent to my home, valid for 2 years. And I paid on time every month. Then, in 2003 I resigned my fitness club membership and the card expired some months later. But I phoned DC to ask for an extension, and after 2 weeks they sent me another card, valid for 5 years!

I guess it's all about TRUST! Of course Trust does not depend on one's country of citizenship, as there are many Japanese people who commit fraud, but it seems that credit card companies go by the rule of "distrust the gaijin first". Sad and unbelievable, but true!

Maciamo
Apr 7, 2005, 20:01
That happened to me too, I joined a fitness club in 2001 and got a Visa credit card, issued by DC Card company. I had to send them a photocopy of my passport, Japanese visa and a certificate from my employer, which was annoying; but then I just got the card sent to my home, valid for 2 years.

I didn't need to submit any photo nor a copy or my passport or alien registration card (only the application form) and got a card valid for 3 years immediately. Maybe it depends on the nationality. Americans (and Israelis) are known to live on credits, while people from the Benelux or Switzerland are known for being thrifty and financially reliable.

FireyRei
Apr 16, 2005, 03:25
Had no problem at all getting my Sumitomo Visa.

duff_o_josh
Jun 2, 2005, 14:13
my smbc visa is on its way.

ccpyue
Mar 21, 2008, 04:40
My daughter went to work in Japan 8 months ago. She rejected several times on applying a Japanese credit card. Could you let me know which credit card companies that accept your application? Thanks.

JimmySeal
Mar 21, 2008, 10:06
I was rejected for a Chase Amazon.co.jp card last year, and I have a Chase Amazon.com card with a $5000 credit line and no outstanding balance. You'd think that would count for something.
Just recently got turned down for a Tsutaya visa card.

I heard that the Post Office savings account card can be used like a visa card. Is that true?

Edit: Whups. Maciamo's article answered my question.

Dutch Baka
Mar 21, 2008, 10:13
I was rejected for a SMBC Visa card... got a Japanese letter at home saying:

We are very sorry, but we can not give you a credit card.

That was it, there was no reason or something it just said I could not get a card...

I guess I am going to apply again one of these months for maybe a daimaru card or something... hope it's going to work this time.

I was rejected for a SMBC Visa card... got a Japanese letter at home saying:

We are very sorry, but we can not give you a credit card.

That was it, there was no reason or something it just said I could not get a card...

I guess I am going to apply again one of these months for maybe a daimaru card or something... hope it's going to work this time.

JimmySeal
Mar 21, 2008, 10:42
Yea that's generally the way it goes. No reason given and a lot of insincere polite gobbledygook.

The article suggested getting a visa debit card from your bank, or one from the post office. Is there any particular reason you want a credit card, as opposed to a debit card?

FrustratedDave
Mar 21, 2008, 18:46
Just recieved my Japanese platinum visa card with $XX,XXX credit limit. But was rejected countless times. There is no way you are getting a Japanese credit card from any company unless you have something special (not saying that I do, but my bank manager pushed the card through for me.) It is common practise for card companies to deny foriegners without a second thought upfront. I eventually was asked to provide a copy of my permanent residency and a copy of my yearly income, from there they deemed it safe to give me a credit card.

Oh and Jimmy, I was rejected for a card from the same bank, but I then procceded to the back manager who I do my business with and explained the situation, only then was I able to get the card that I wanted.

Even cards with banks will reject you.

ccpyue
Mar 21, 2008, 22:59
Thanks for info. It seems my daughter can never get a Japan credit card because she's on working visa.

GaijinPunch
May 14, 2008, 01:28
Figured I'd keep this going. I had a card through Citi years ago. Never got the automatic deduction setup right (they didn't like my signature or some BS) so it was late by 2 weeks every time, and they turned it off. I know that can't help, but I'm using two Japanese banks for my side business. Both have several salaries go through them a year, and the main one has the excess which is to pay for taxes at the end of the fiscal year sitting there earning .00001% interest. That amount is far more than any human credit card limit. Yet, I get rejected by both.

When I get my tax forms in this year and my first year back is documented, I will play the inquisitive gaijin. Then, the steaming pissed gaijin.

gaijinalways
May 14, 2008, 12:48
I applied for a Saison card some years ago and got it immediately. I don't know if having a Japanese wife with good credit helped or not.

On a side note, my American ATT card was canceled (I didn't use it for 14 months) and when I reapplied, they didn't want to reissue it because I no longer live in the US.

Glenski
May 14, 2008, 13:12
Friend of mine is American and has been living in Japan for over 20 years. Has a Japanese wife, and he is vice-president of a language school (biggest in the city). He applied for a credit card from a gasoline company and got rejected (no reason cited). After phoning them to learn more why, he said they told him they can't divulge that sort of information.

So, it just goes to show, you can be accepted or rejected. Doesn't really matter. Go to the next company and try.

FrustratedDave
May 14, 2008, 20:26
I applied for a Saison card some years ago and got it immediately. I don't know if having a Japanese wife with good credit helped or not.
On a side note, my American ATT card was canceled (I didn't use it for 14 months) and when I reapplied, they didn't want to reissue it because I no longer live in the US.
I will put money on it that you stated that you had another credit card and supplied them with that info.

Mikawa Ossan
May 14, 2008, 20:33
I'm surprised that I never posted on this thread yet.

I have gotten two (and a half) credit cards, and I got them both when I was single. (I say a half because I could only use it at one gasoline chain.) I had no problem whatsoever procuring them, either.

I suppose some companies are stricter than others when issuing credit cards to foreigners.

FrustratedDave
May 15, 2008, 09:20
I'm surprised that I never posted on this thread yet.
I have gotten two (and a half) credit cards, and I got them both when I was single. (I say a half because I could only use it at one gasoline chain.) I had no problem whatsoever procuring them, either.
I suppose some companies are stricter than others when issuing credit cards to foreigners.
Not the case, this trend is accross the board. Did you have a credit card that was in your name that you got while in the states?

Mikawa Ossan
May 15, 2008, 18:03
Hmm....good question. I cancelled all of my credit cards that I got from the U.S. some years ago. I figured that I never used them and they were too much hassle to keep around anyway.

Dutch Baka
May 15, 2008, 18:47
any information about Japanese and not being able to get a CC? Maybe living situation and working situation matters... plus the guy behind the desk :okashii:

ASHIKAGA
May 15, 2008, 19:42
I was turned down a couple of times last summer when I appplied after coming back to Japan after living abroad for a long time. They did not share with me the reason for it but I suspect it had something to do with the fact I had been out of the country for 20 years and did not have any track record whatsoever here in Japan.
My current job is my first "real" job I have ever had in Japan so I will wait a few more months and establish myself here, so to speak, and apply again. :smoke:

semprni
Jun 7, 2008, 01:47
I first tried to get a credit card from my bank (Mitsubishi Tokyo UFJ); initially they rejected me, so I tried CitiBank - they also rejected me. Then I retried my bank after 3 months, by which time I had paid in about a million yen to my account. Then I got one, no problems.

I think Japanese banks are worried about foreigners leaving with big credit card debts and never repaying them, but once you've proved you're earning, things should get easier.

For the record: I was a JSPS researcher, which isn't a company at all, so I don't think employer was an issue.

ranma_chan4
Aug 12, 2008, 02:51
I don't think that it has too much to do with what country you are from because in some cases they don't know if you sign up for a card by mail or through a store. My suggestion is to first try to get one through Costco Japan. I got my first Master Card from there my fourth year here, no problem. I tried for the heck of it at one store (can't remember which), but got turned down. What really ticked me off was that my own bank, Mitsubishi Tokyo which I have been with for 7 years, turned me down!!! (I had trouble with them before because I think they were doing one of those police checks of gaijin cards because they claimed that my hanko did not match the hanko stamp on file, even though I got it hand-made from China, totally uncopiable! They asked to see the card, after that, no problem with the hanko!) I also just got one from Citibank Japan, no problem, but I have to pay an annual fee if I don't keep a certain amount of money in the bank.

The problem here is that the system is VERY subjective, even for Japanese, and there is no system of "building credit" here, like in the US per se. If you can, do it through a store but if ANYONE asks you to see your gaijin card, don't bother. And remember, actually the law says that you only have to show your gaijin card to the police and immigration (The problem is that some places actually DO need some sort of proof of residence, even from Japanese; but I have a Japanese drivers license like most Japanese do, so this is no problem for me.)

Glenski
Aug 12, 2008, 11:40
Residence can be assessed with your alien card, tax records, etc.

Charles Barkley
Aug 12, 2008, 23:56
Those who have been rejected for credit cards here--why not get one from your home country?

Or if the job/money/etc you have is in Japan, does that render you ineligible for appropriate limit cards in your home country?

I have just kept my American credit card and used that on the rare occassions I actually need it (just online purchasing).

ranma_chan4
Aug 13, 2008, 01:01
I think that it was mentioned previously that you lose out on the exchange rate if you use your US credit card here. Also, you have to keep track of your purchases from here and send money from here to pay for your US card bills, which the price to send money from Japan has gone up considerably. In addition, just like in the states, you can get cards with points and bonus and get free stuff. All in all, it is just easier to deal with if you are living in Japan, getting paid in yen, and paying off your card here. It is a matter of convenience!

And yes, it would be a bit difficult to convince a US credit card company to send all your bills and set up your address in Japan. I believe that many card companies require you to have a US address, but I suppose you could get around that by using your parents or friends address back home and checking up on your bills through the internet. But again, it is very much a big hassle!

And I don't believe for a minute that you are the real Charles Barkely!

hsakakibara1
Aug 15, 2008, 22:41
For foreigners I heard were Nippon Shimpan, any department store card,

ottovudu
Dec 17, 2008, 09:29
Same here. At first, I simply and honestly thought my bank (MUFJ) made a mistake in treating my application.

Applied at AMEX as well, same result, rejection and no mention of a reason whatsoever.

I actually tried to communicate with my bank and kindly asked them what i should do to get a credit card but no clear answer, just "try again in at least 6 months".

Really frustrating.

epigene
Dec 17, 2008, 09:41
any information about Japanese and not being able to get a CC? Maybe living situation and working situation matters... plus the guy behind the desk :okashii:
Being Japanese but self-employed is another hurdle, esp. if your operation is small (just me and my husband).

But, my husband had credit cards he got while still working for a big business corporation. When we delivered on our first very large purchase (in millions of yen), the credit card company immediately promoted our membership. :blush:

I think what most young Japanese without jobs in big companies do is to get the most easily obtainable credit card (such as from a supermarket chain), build up credit history and move on from there.

However, with the economy sagging, credit card issues will probably become harder to get than ever for Japanese, too.

Echigo
Dec 19, 2008, 15:05
Being Japanese but self-employed is another hurdle, esp. if your operation is small (just me and my husband).
But, my husband had credit cards he got while still working for a big business corporation. When we delivered on our first very large purchase (in millions of yen), the credit card company immediately promoted our membership. :blush:
I think what most young Japanese without jobs in big companies do is to get the most easily obtainable credit card (such as from a supermarket chain), build up credit history and move on from there.
However, with the economy sagging, credit card issues will probably become harder to get than ever for Japanese, too.

Anyone else find it amusing that the big Japanese banks have ruined their balance sheets so thoroughly and are asking for government money, but if you work in a small business that they treat YOU like you are the worst credit risk in the history of the world? Hypocrites!


Those who have been rejected for credit cards here--why not get one from your home country?
Or if the job/money/etc you have is in Japan, does that render you ineligible for appropriate limit cards in your home country?
I have just kept my American credit card and used that on the rare occassions I actually need it (just online purchasing).
Because making payment on them from Japan is a real pain in da butt.

FrustratedDave
Dec 20, 2008, 08:06
Same here. At first, I simply and honestly thought my bank (MUFJ) made a mistake in treating my application.
Applied at AMEX as well, same result, rejection and no mention of a reason whatsoever.
I actually tried to communicate with my bank and kindly asked them what i should do to get a credit card but no clear answer, just "try again in at least 6 months".
Really frustrating.
Wouldn't matter if you did not make a mistake.

Mikawa Ossan
Dec 20, 2008, 18:29
Here'S a question for you. Do you have a documented record of a postive cash flow at the bank you applied for your credit card?

If not and you REALLY want your credit card, the place to start is there. Open a savings account and have a net positive cash flow for 6 months or so and then see if you get rejected again.

Frontman
Feb 3, 2009, 13:30
I applied for a credit card from JP Bank about 3 months after arriving in Japan on a one-year work visa. A week after mailing in my application the bank called my company to verify my employment. They then spoke to me on the phone and asked to to verify my date of birth, and address. About 3 weeks later the card was delivered to my door. JP bank cards are apparently issued by SMBC.
Someone mentioned earlier in the thread that many American banks won't mail your bill to Japan, or that they require an American address. This was not true in my case. I have a World MC from Citi, another World MC from Juniper, and a Disney Visa from Chase, all three banks had no problem changing to my Japan address, and I receive bills from them in the mail each month.
I'm still trying to work something out with Amex. I have an Amex Platinum which I love to have for the travel perks, but the Japanese Amex Platinum has a much higher annual fee (the American annual fee is already $450 per year).

FrustratedDave
Feb 3, 2009, 17:13
I applied for a credit card from JP Bank about 3 months after arriving in Japan on a one-year work visa. A week after mailing in my application the bank called my company to verify my employment. They then spoke to me on the phone and asked to to verify my date of birth, and address. About 3 weeks later the card was delivered to my door. JP bank cards are apparently issued by SMBC.
Someone mentioned earlier in the thread that many American banks won't mail your bill to Japan, or that they require an American address. This was not true in my case. I have a World MC from Citi, another World MC from Juniper, and a Disney Visa from Chase, all three banks had no problem changing to my Japan address, and I receive bills from them in the mail each month.
I'm still trying to work something out with Amex. I have an Amex Platinum which I love to have for the travel perks, but the Japanese Amex Platinum has a much higher annual fee (the American annual fee is already $450 per year).
You got b/c you have other credit cards.

Hermit Crab
Feb 3, 2009, 22:53
No problems at all. Being able to confirm all the info on your application when they call in Japanese without hesitation seems to be a major requirement.

Glenski
Feb 4, 2009, 06:08
You got b/c you have other credit cards.
Doesn't matter. Every credit card company has its own rules. Coworker of mine has lived here for over 20 years, owns property, built his own house, speaks fluent Japanese, has Japanese wife and kid, etc. Of course, he has other credit cards.

He was denied a credit card from a lousy gasoline company. When he phoned them to ask why, they wouldn't tell him. Go figure.

FrustratedDave
Feb 4, 2009, 07:55
No problems at all. Being able to confirm all the info on your application when they call in Japanese without hesitation seems to be a major requirement.
That doesn't mean much...

Doesn't matter. Every credit card company has its own rules. Coworker of mine has lived here for over 20 years, owns property, built his own house, speaks fluent Japanese, has Japanese wife and kid, etc. Of course, he has other credit cards.
He was denied a credit card from a lousy gasoline company. When he phoned them to ask why, they wouldn't tell him. Go figure.
Agreed, holding another credit card does not garrentee you passing . But everytime I applied in the past and was rejected, I rang the comapanies and everytime I was asked if I had another credit card, it just seems to be a major requirement.

Hermit Crab
Feb 4, 2009, 09:33
I've done some translation and interpretation work for a credit card company here. They tend to be more receptive to applicants working for large, recognizable companies (i.e. GEOS as opposed to Bob's English School). More receptive to those with a land-line as their main contact point, as opposed to a cell number. More receptive to those who use a Japanese driver's license as ID rather than a foreign residents' card. Much more receptive to those who can answer the confirmation phone call in passable Japanese. YMMV.

Frontman
Feb 4, 2009, 11:16
You got b/c you have other credit cards.

They did not ask me if I had any other credit cards, nor was there such request on the application. I do not speak much Japanese, so that was also not much of a factor. The only positive thing that weighed in my favor was that I do work for a large company.

FrustratedDave
Feb 4, 2009, 11:20
I've done some translation and interpretation work for a credit card company here. They tend to be more receptive to applicants working for large, recognizable companies (i.e. GEOS as opposed to Bob's English School). More receptive to those with a land-line as their main contact point, as opposed to a cell number. More receptive to those who use a Japanese driver's license as ID rather than a foreign residents' card. Much more receptive to those who can answer the confirmation phone call in passable Japanese. YMMV.
Although the things you say are true, but being reseptive is where it ends, it still won't have much of a bearing on if you can get the card or not.

Trust when I say that it was ridiculus that I got turned down the amount of times I did. So I rang up the bank manager and told him to get down to my office and get on the phone and have the card company approve my request, of corse I got the card.

I believe a big problem is that foriegners go home without paying payments and it has affected us all.

Glenski
Feb 5, 2009, 05:52
I've done some translation and interpretation work for a credit card company here. They tend to be more receptive to applicants working for large, recognizable companies (i.e. GEOS as opposed to Bob's English School). More receptive to those with a land-line as their main contact point, as opposed to a cell number. More receptive to those who use a Japanese driver's license as ID rather than a foreign residents' card. Much more receptive to those who can answer the confirmation phone call in passable Japanese. YMMV.
My friend had all of those requirements. Opinion now?

pipokun
Feb 5, 2009, 21:46
Opinion now?

1. Total years of continuous (full-time) employment in the company then
2. How many cards did he have then?
3. Total debt incl. mortgage
Your cases sometimes sound somewhat exceptional and/or ambiguous, though I don't need his personal info above. If he is really upset about the rejection, I highly recommend that he should ask the competent organization for his credit history, "how clean he is?".

*snip
This is not about Glenski case, but general info for people, Japanese/non-Japanese, who want to get a card.
4. Which card, bank/retailer/sarakin (consumer loan firm) or else were you applied?
I think Japan is the easiest and cheapest country to open your bank account, but the credit card of banks is the hardest credit card you can get.
5. How many times did you applied to a card in a short period of time?
6. How many times did you was rejected?

E-bank offers you a card with visa debit card, so when you desperately want to buy something online, just apply to it.

*snip 2
This is a kind reform recommendation from the US.

Credit Bureaus: Promote sound credit underwriting,
deter excessive lending and improve consumer
welfare and competitive credit markets by creating a
legal and regulatory framework for a credit bureau
system that facilitates more accurate risk pricing for
consumers and small businesses by collecting and
providing fair, open access to comprehensive full-file
credit information.

I read Japan will soon start the similar credit history hell in accordance with the recommendation above. I think it is good to change the present saving-crazy mindset of the Japanese, esp., the elderly people, but the excessive lending must be one of the reason of the present financial crisis... Sorry if the new spending-crazy Japanese would cause another troubles in 20XX.

Glenski
Feb 6, 2009, 06:08
pipokun,
Yes, a lot of what you wrote about qualificatoins for a card are valid. I won't bother to look deeply into my friend/coworker's situation, but I can easily tell you this:

He is not a financial risk.
He speaks very good Japanese (and filled out the application himself in Japanese).
He is "clean".

He called the company directly and asked what the deal was. They wouldn't give him a clear answer and even defended the point he politely asked about whether they rejected him because he was a foreigner. They simply said they couldn't say what their reason was, so he had to live with that. He doesn't like it, but it is weird.

Hermit Crab
Feb 6, 2009, 11:34
Glenski my man,

I wrote "more receptive", not "guarantees". There are other criteria, which the company does not disclose. Also, most credit card companies have a policy not to give the reason for rejection. Doesn't matter if you are foreign or Japanese. If you call and ask, you will be told they cannot say. Regardless of the specific reason. You may rant and rave all you wish, but in the end you'd be better served getting over it and finding a company that can and will serve your needs.

Glenski
Feb 6, 2009, 13:00
Hermit Crab,
I understood what you wrote (more receptive vs. guaranteed). I responded only to show to support the fact that it is not guarantee.

My friend is long over it, but I still think this is a good example.

Hermit Crab
Feb 6, 2009, 13:58
Hermit Crab,
I understood what you wrote (more receptive vs. guaranteed). I responded only to show to support the fact that it is not guarantee.

My friend is long over it, but I still think this is a good example.
I think your constant harping over one particular instance of rejection is adding to the overall impression given on this thread that it is extremely difficult to get a credit card issued to you in Japan. Several posters have given good advice to better your odds. Naturally, there will be difficulties and obstacles to many aspects of our lives, being non-Japanese. Best to accept that, deal with it, and learn what can be done to minimize them. The OP's question "No Japanese credit cards for foreigners" gets a resounding "False!" answer.

pipokun
Feb 6, 2009, 21:45
Hermit Crab,
I understood what you wrote (more receptive vs. guaranteed). I responded only to show to support the fact that it is not guarantee.

My friend is long over it, but I still think this is a good example.

Yes, he is a good example.


owns property
built his own house
he has other credit cards

But nobody knows how financially clean he was at the time of sad rejection.

I don't know how many times my friends, rich or poor, forgot putting 1 yen more before credit card companies took money out of their banking account.
I don't know about the financial situation of my friends, 1. to 6. in my last post above, either.


personal credit information center
http://www.fcbj.jp/english/index.html
The center somewhere like the above does not tell him the reason, but disclose his record of transaction upon his request.

Glenski
Feb 7, 2009, 07:45
Hermit Crab,
Point taken about bettering your odds. Would you at least accept my point, too, that despite bettering your odds, thee are going to be cases where foreigners will not get a credit card no matter how good your background check looks?

Pipokun,
This happened a very short time ago. Don't try to confound the issue with "was he clean back then?" questions.

FrustratedDave
Feb 7, 2009, 09:04
I think your constant harping over one particular instance of rejection is adding to the overall impression given on this thread that it is extremely difficult to get a credit card issued to you in Japan. Several posters have given good advice to better your odds. Naturally, there will be difficulties and obstacles to many aspects of our lives, being non-Japanese. Best to accept that, deal with it, and learn what can be done to minimize them. The OP's question "No Japanese credit cards for foreigners" gets a resounding "False!" answer.

Unlike what others have posted here, I was told I could not have the card due to be foriegn by the credit card company. And without going into details, I am member of two boards in a companies that I run here. Here is the kicker, if I was to go through my company they said they would approve it straight away instead of using my name only. So it has nothing to do with working for a big company. I also own 500 tsubo's of land and a house, as in I do not have any payments left on it.

When I was said I wanted it in my name they stated that I could provide a copy of my passport and my permenat residency visa, but it would be very unlikely that the verdict would change. That is when I rang my bank manager and got him to get me the card, but not everyone can do that can they?

pipokun
Feb 7, 2009, 18:03
...
Pipokun,
This happened a very short time ago. Don't try to confound the issue with "was he clean back then?" questions.

The OP, FrustratedDave, and other posters got their cards, so their stories must be good for people in similar situations, but only you know the case of your friend here.
So all I can do is just a guesswork or to feel sorry for him.

It is great if he come here to share his stories when he got other cards.

FrustratedDave
Feb 7, 2009, 20:41
The OP, FrustratedDave, and other posters got their cards, so their stories must be good for people in similar situations, but only you know the case of your friend here.
So all I can do is just a guesswork or to feel sorry for him.

It is great if he come here to share his stories when he got other cards.
The thing is that people are not telling the whole story. People who already have cards will find getting them a lot easier. Those who don't will have a difficult time no matter what company you work for.

Hermit Crab
Feb 8, 2009, 11:25
Sure Glenski/FD,

There are times that you may be rejected regardless of meeting all the regular requirements. It may even be due to having the gall to be foreign and asking to be treated as another human being. Still, with many companies, most of the time, if you take the advice of those who have successfully negotiated the application process, you have a better chance of ending up with a card issued from a Japanese credit company.

One other point I recall from the translation stint...if you've held the same job for better than a year, your application will be looked on more favorably than someone's who has changed work recently.

Glenski
Feb 8, 2009, 16:23
Still, with many companies, most of the time, if you take the advice of those who have successfully negotiated the application process, you have a better chance of ending up with a card issued from a Japanese credit company.Just what the heck is this supposed to mean? What "advice" are you referring to?


One other point I recall from the translation stint...if you've held the same job for better than a year, your application will be looked on more favorably than someone's who has changed work recently.Yup, and my friend was vice-president of his company for almost 20 years.

pipokun
Feb 8, 2009, 17:11
...
Yup, and my friend was vice-president of his company for almost 20 years.

I read quite an interesting case that a Japanese medical doctor in his 40, owing his house, feeding his family etc.. was rejected to get a cheap credit card. Of course, he has premium cards.

The advice (or a guesswork) from a website, "Help! What to do with my application!!!", goes...
that some credit companies do not always want to issue unnecessary cards which, the companies think, are not supposed to use, esp., when you have already got other cards of the same credit company;
and that he should not worry about it (the rejection) and should keep using his premium cards.

If you need the source or other sad and unbelievable stories esp., of Japanese, I am glad to bring it here, but you or your friend can get a practical advice here from FrustratedDave.
If I were him, I would ask the gas station owner to help me with the card.
After getting it, I would be glad to join here to share my own story.

Glenski
Feb 9, 2009, 05:49
pipokun,
The situation you described does not fit my friend. I already said he contacted the credit card company, and they would not explain why, nor "help". Done deal. Sucks, but done deal.

Hermit Crab
Feb 9, 2009, 12:57
Just what the heck is this supposed to mean? What "advice" are you referring to?
Yup, and my friend was vice-president of his company for almost 20 years.
Glenski,

Really...you harp on this single instance of someone not getting a card. Big, fat, hairy deal! We all know people who have been rejected. Personally, I do too. But, I know many more who were successful. Even those who ran their own businesses, were not exactly doing all their taxes and expenses on the up-an-up, let alone their visa issues. Rather than the constant negativity, why not try and give some helpful advice, or go find some if you don't really know.

The advice I'm referring to is the advice I gave in a couple earlier posts in this thread, as well as advice others have given on other forums and blogs about Japan. Get out there! Do the research! Talk to successful people. Scour the 'Net. Hit the library. Talk to those in the banking and finance industries. Learn how the system works. Learn how to better your odds. If you get one strike, don't throw a hissy fit. Man up. Work harder. Sink or swim. Sounds like you'd rather sink, and then try to b-i-t-c-h about it while the water's filling your lungs. How's that working out for you?! :okashii:

pipokun
Feb 9, 2009, 18:43
pipokun,
The situation you described does not fit my friend. I already said he contacted the credit card company, and they would not explain why, nor "help". Done deal. Sucks, but done deal.

What about the case of FrustratedDave?
His case was about the bank issued credit card and the bank manager helped him.
I don't know how often your friend goes to the gas station or don't know how much a gas station owner has influence for the credit card issue, though.
The most visible difference is that FrustratedDave shares his story, but your friend is not here.

Deeply breath out by sharing other stories of him when he got other cards. Your friend is a very lucky guy with a considerate friend like you.

Glenski
Feb 9, 2009, 19:50
Rather than the constant negativity, why not try and give some helpful advice, I've been posting helpful advice on this and half a dozen other forums for more than a decade, thank you. The fact that I point out a piece of reality which is negative (and which people seem to try to find loopholes in, to their dismay) has nothing to do with being "constantly negative". It's reality. I get this type of response whenever I challenge a rose-colored glasses outlook with a heads-up one. Not negative. Reality.


The advice I'm referring to is the advice I gave in a couple earlier posts in this thread, as well as advice others have given on other forums and blogs about Japan. Get out there! Do the research!
Why? I'm not the one who got rejected or is asking how to get the card.

Let's just stop here.

Mikawa Ossan
Feb 9, 2009, 20:28
Not the case, this trend is accross the board. Did you have a credit card that was in your name that you got while in the states?
I reread this and thought about this some more. It is not outside the realm of possibility that I still had an American issued credit card when I applied for my first card in Japan, although I have no idea how the financial institution that I applied to would ever have gotten that information. Are you saying that they would know somehow even if one never supplies them with that information?

FrustratedDave
Feb 9, 2009, 22:18
I reread this and thought about this some more. It is not outside the realm of possibility that I still had an American issued credit card when I applied for my first card in Japan, although I have no idea how the financial institution that I applied to would ever have gotten that information. Are you saying that they would know somehow even if one never supplies them with that information?
That is entirely possible as companies can share information. Although in regards to their bigger clients they tend not to share information with each other unless that particular company is in some way affiliated with that company or they have some sort of an aggrement, this stop rival companies taking their business. But with your avergae joe, anything is possible.

Hermit Crab
Feb 16, 2009, 12:14
Don't worry Glenski. You can refer your friend here soon enough.

From the Aussie/Kiwi Chamber of Commerce Japan homepage:

Taking the Hassle Out Of the Tax Season in Japan
GaijinTax.Com


Japan’s Tax Season is fast approaching, which for many translates into nothing but confusion, uncertainty and unanswered questions. This is particularly true for foreigners who either sign yearly contracts or work for themselves.

However there is now a website to take some of this hassle and confusion away. GaijinTax.Com’s tagline says it all – “A Foreigner’s Guide to Tax in Japan”. The site is written in plain English and takes users step by step through the various sections in the forms which they need to fill in order to file a tax return in Japan. There are also unofficial English versions of the declaration and expense forms, making it easy for non-Japanese speakers to fill out and then transpose the details onto the official forms. Best of all, it’s FREE!

Hot on the heels of completing his MBA in Marketing, the site’s creator, Australian Emil Gorgees, is currently working on a project at Ernst & Young (EY) Japan with fellow Australians Dean Page, EY Tax Partner, and Paul Previtera, EY Senior International Tax Manager. Emil explains his motivation for creating the site: “I wanted to make it easier for foreigners to get things done in Japan. I had gone through the same struggles myself and found that the largest issue was the lack of simple, straight forward information in English.”

The site is still growing with information added daily. “Once this is done, I plan to launch my other project, GaijinMoney.Com, a free site dedicated to showing foreigners in Japan how to apply for credit cards, send money back home, evaluate banking services, and so on” Emil said.

Tax Returns need to be filed at your local tax office between Monday 16 February - Monday 16 March.

Glenski
Feb 16, 2009, 13:39
thanks for the site, HC.

I am interested in both sites, actually, to pass along to others on the teachers' blog I edit here. I wonder how much this guy actually knows, though. He wrote:
National Health Insurance is also based on your income. For zero income earners, there is a base fee of approximately 7000yen. If you have some form of income, then you must also pay an additional 5% ‘medical levy’. So for someone earning 4,000,000yen/year, expect your health insurance to be about 150,000yen/year.
Teachers just starting out make about 3 million yen/year, and after their first year here, they pay about twice that in NHI premiums, sometimes more. Maybe he just believes that everyone gets copayments from their employer, which is outright false.

Still, thanks. I only just opened the file and will continue to read it.

Larry Battle
Apr 6, 2009, 23:51
Most people I see use cash.
But what is the advantage of having a credit card?

Glenski
Apr 8, 2009, 07:25
1. Being able to buy something and pay in installments.
2. Not having to have cash on you (dangerous).
3. Not having to risk ATM bandits.
4. Credit rating for loans.
5. Ties to frequent flyer mileage or other perks.

pipokun
Apr 8, 2009, 19:12
1. Being able to buy something and pay in installments.
2. Not having to have cash on you (dangerous).
3. Not having to risk ATM bandits.
4. Credit rating for loans.
5. Ties to frequent flyer mileage or other perks.

Aren't 1. and 4. the cause of greed which they must learn from the present economic turmoil? The credit rating may be a fair system, but isn't it slightly unfair that you need to borrow money or hugely spend above your income to earn it?

japanesewords
Apr 8, 2009, 20:29
It somewhat depends on how long you have been in Japan and also what company you go with. It's kind of like the States. Once you receive one it gets easier to get others The thing to realize is that your credit history from other countries do not carry over.

kawanop
Jun 17, 2009, 11:20
Hi
Adding my 3 cents:
Live here 30 years. From US. After permanent residence less hassle to get cards. And many cancelled as who needs more than one? (From sports clubs, dept stores).

No point to get US based cards as you have to send payment, one debit-card-like feature of J credit cards I like.

But Delta says they will stop their Resona VISA card, so I went shopping for new card as my partner uses ANA and that would work to east coast. They give only 70 percent miles for cheaper tickets, but two of their cards give 25 percent bonus, so why not? (wide and gold)

And they are less restrictive in terms of USING miles (United is either 65,000 or 130,000
for no restrictions, ANA is 40, 55. 60 thousand depending on season.). And using partner airlines
is the same 65,000. So while UA Japan card gives full mileage accrual as opposed to ANA, USE is more
difficult, or so it seems.

Anyway, applied for GOLD and got told I was ok for WIDE. Actually very little difference. GOLD is a joke
anyway. Main difference is GOLD costs more and you get a little more insurance. This is for JCB,
but as I am not sure how useful JCB is in the States, may try VISA, who presumably know me from DELTA. ANA has both.

Maybe there is a higher limit if I want to buy something on credit or withdraw funds?

Question I have--they ask for company and I put down one of three at which I work PART TIME. If they had all the companies, which I am unable to write in, they would be able to find my income is more than what I made when i was fully employed at a single company.

So does anyone know which is better--to write in one company or write in self employed, and then somehow account for my income (6 million these days) showing Japanese tax?

I am happy to be corrected re any info I posted and to have anyone clarify things asked about above.
Thank you!

Gaijin 06
Aug 14, 2009, 16:34
My friend had all of those requirements. Opinion now?

Maybe he was disqualified on his choice of friends? :blush:

Seriously, all banks using different scoring systems - it could have been as simple as the amount of credit he already has.

Air
Jan 10, 2010, 23:43
I'm very glad that I came across this theme.
I'm a foreigner living in Japan, permanent residence, Japanese husband (working for one of old major companies), kids, property, no loans on my name (though we have a loan for land and house - on my husband`s name), fluent Japanese and I have some amount of money on my deposit.
My credit card applications were rejected three times... At first, I thought ithere was some mistake. Then I started to worry if I had something written on my name that I might not know about, etc - we called the credit company and, like other people here, have got the reply that the reason for rejection will not be disclosed. Very unsettling - one starts to feel that he is a suspect or something. Well, until I read the messages on this site - now I know that I'm not alone!
I can live without a credit card but I would like to be able to purchase music and books etc online... Does anyone know how can I get around to that without a credit card?
PS: Sorry if that's a stupid question - I actually never bought anything except things for which one can pay in cash or via a bank transfer, so I'm a novice in that.

Glenski
Jan 11, 2010, 08:35
You have a few options. People who don't work cannot get credit cards, my J wife says.

1. See if Amazon.co.jp will let you make an order to be delivered COD and not require a credit card number. We've had such deliveries made, and you pay when the books arrive, but I don't remember if we used my Amazon account or the related credit card info.

2. You could send the money for such things via Post Office.

3. You could try to get a store card, instead of a VISA, JCB, or other major card. For example, see if Parco or AEON will let you make such a card using your husband's bank information. My wife has a couple of these, but she said you have the option to use them as credit cards or just point cards. She took the latter option.

4. You might also want to ask your husband if it's ok to use his credit card info when you place orders on Amazon. You'd probably have to use his name when you place the order, but that's between you and him to agree on.

FrustratedDave
Jan 11, 2010, 08:42
I'm very glad that I came across this theme.
I'm a foreigner living in Japan, permanent residence, Japanese husband (working for one of old major companies), kids, property, no loans on my name (though we have a loan for land and house - on my husband`s name), fluent Japanese and I have some amount of money on my deposit.
My credit card applications were rejected three times... At first, I thought ithere was some mistake. Then I started to worry if I had something written on my name that I might not know about, etc - we called the credit company and, like other people here, have got the reply that the reason for rejection will not be disclosed. Very unsettling - one starts to feel that he is a suspect or something. Well, until I read the messages on this site - now I know that I'm not alone!
I can live without a credit card but I would like to be able to purchase music and books etc online... Does anyone know how can I get around to that without a credit card?
PS: Sorry if that's a stupid question - I actually never bought anything except things for which one can pay in cash or via a bank transfer, so I'm a novice in that.

Unfortunately this seems to be the case in most instances.

As for getting a card, can you apply for a family card through your husband? If so they should issue you an extra card that is in your name from your husbands account. What you can do then is apply for a card that is seperate from his and it is essential that you fill in the form and say that you hold an existing card. Then you can cancel your card under your husbands account.

I hope this helps.

chestyl
Feb 16, 2010, 07:56
I was an exchange student with Waseda for one year and Mizuho gave me a credit card with a 100,000 yen limit. Just checked a box when I applied for a bank account.

orochi
Feb 16, 2010, 21:05
I've been rejected by Saison, Citibank, as well as my own bank. It's very annoying. I think as soon as they see a name in katakana, they throw it in the reject pile.

Though I have heard that FrustratedDave's advice can work well. Get a family card via your spouse's card, use it for a bit and earn up Japanese credit history, then apply for your own card. I should give it a shot myself.

I've also heard AEON is fairly decent in accepting foreigners.

gaijinalways
Feb 16, 2010, 23:26
I think as several posters have already mentioned several factors help with getting a credit card in Japan (and in other countries);

1 steady employment

2 work for a major company

3 married to a Japanese spouse (of ours a factor in Japan)

4 have credit cards already

5 have a good credit history

6 own property (as long as your available cash flow is okay)

And yes, university students are the exception, as the credit card companies assume that in most cases if the student doesn't pay, the parents will (I used to market these cards, I had a few fraternities working for me). Also they are looking at potential future income, as usually college grads will make more money on average.